After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

Controls sought on retail chains
By Kate Bucklin

PORTLAND "“ A community group working on ways to limit chain restaurants downtown would like to add limits on retail chains, too.

At a meeting Oct. 11, a group of residents and business owners presented their case to the Community Development Committee, a City Council subcommittee charged with reviewing the possible restrictions.

The group, which was not organized by the city, but has worked with City Councilor Karen Geraghty, suggested the city limit "formula businesses" in the Arts District and the Old Port to 10 retailers and 10 restaurants through a Formula Business Overlay Zone.

[url=http://www.theforecaster.net/story.php?storyid=8031]source[/url]

EJ
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

Yep, a good old cross section of Portland Business Owners I am sure.

I did not have a chance to give her feedback. Nope nada, nothing.

Karen G, the communistic practice of stopping business that does not fit the Master Plan.

EJ

Henry Clay
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

I'm sure South Portland and the other neighboring communties react with glee whenever Portland shoots down business development.

Vic Berardelli
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

Not just South Portland, Henry. Farther up the coast will enjoy too. How many travelers see a city on the map, get off the interstate, go down the main drag and utter, "What a dump!" and keep driving until they see an interesting town worth parking to visit? What is a drive up Congress Street now but panhandlers and For Lease signs in windows?

EJ
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

Vic

To make it worse, a traveler needs to get off 95, onto 295, to go through downtown portland. you have to be educated to know that, and the Turnpike, wants you to use the Falmouth SPUR, to get to 295, not go through Portland via scarborough.

I had some out of staters tell me, they almost ran out of gas, trying to get filled up in Portland, it is not as bad, thanks to the 24 station near the Train Station, but not one exit off 295, has a filling station near it.

Such a service, is something you do not forget if you need to get travelers to stop.

Then, drive down Congress Street and try to find a place to eat, most would probally stop at Denny's, then say like Vic pointed out, what a dump.

EJ

Marlin94
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

At first, I thought the attempt to keep Hooters out of Portland was just some liberal/pc thing, you know "it objectifies women" or some such nonsense (and I still think that is in the mix), but now it appers that they don't want any new business down there, and god forbid if its a chain. They can have their dumpy downtown, bums, transients and all.

Tony Bessey
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

This kind of policy shows you just out of touch Portland's leftist community is. The very businesses they are seeking to prevent from becoming part of the downtown district are also the ones that attract paying customers to all the other little shops in the area. The creative economy is nothing but socialized arts dressed up as an economic development program. Most people in the creative economy don't understand squat about economics or basic economic principle. So in the long run downtown Portland is headed towards the same slum state that is was in before the libra foundation came into town and the city's residential taxpayers are going to pay more in taxes for a public slum and artist welfare district.

I am glad that I don't live in Portland.

Tony

Vic Berardelli
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

Tony, don't gloat that you don't live in Portland. I believe that the health of surrounding communities is directly related to the vibrancy of the core inner city. That is why the situation in Maine's largest city disturbs me greatly.

JIMV
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

[quote="Vic Berardelli"]Not just South Portland, Henry. Farther up the coast will enjoy too. How many travelers see a city on the map, get off the interstate, go down the main drag and utter, "What a dump!" and keep driving until they see an interesting town worth parking to visit? What is a drive up Congress Street now but panhandlers and For Lease signs in windows?[/quote]

Besides, what difference does it make if the tee shirt and cheap souvenir shop is a chain or locally owned?

Stavros Mendros
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

Come to Lewiston.

Tony Bessey
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

[quote="Vic Berardelli"]Tony, don't gloat that you don't live in Portland. I believe that the health of surrounding communities is directly related to the vibrancy of the core inner city. That is why the situation in Maine's largest city disturbs me greatly.[/quote]

Vic,

I grew up in Portland and I thank God every day that I do not live in that City.

Tony

Anonymous
After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

If Maine used half the energy it does to repel business to attract and retain business, jobs would be flourishing instead of flushing.

Slingblade
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

A flushing is exactly what Portland needs. It kind of reminds me of my home town where the established business owners fought against malls for years because if the malls came, people would realize how they were bamboozled by their own local businesses.
Maine needs an enema, Portland and Augusta seem like good places to start.

Jonathan Read
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

hmmm is key bank a formula business?

what about the bar Oasis, there are 3 of them i know of...

baskin robins?

starbucks? (where all the liberals love to hang out)

so many businesses would be gone, a lot of the LOCAL businesses are actually small statewide or new england chains...

Jonathan Read
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

[quote="EJ"]Vic

but not one exit off 295, has a filling station near it.

EJ[/quote]

this isn't true

exit 5 does, exit 6 does fairly close

exit 8 (coming south) exit 10 does.... thats only a small part of 295

Anonymous
After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

[quote="Tony Bessey"]This kind of policy shows you just out of touch Portland's leftist community is. The very businesses they are seeking to prevent from becoming part of the downtown district are also the ones that attract paying customers to all the other little shops in the area. The creative economy is nothing but socialized arts dressed up as an economic development program. Most people in the creative economy don't understand squat about economics or basic economic principle. So in the long run downtown Portland is headed towards the same slum state that is was in before the libra foundation came into town and the city's residential taxpayers are going to pay more in taxes for a public slum and artist welfare district.

I am glad that I don't live in Portland.

Tony[/quote]

we were getting ready to buy land and build a house in the stroudwater area (loved the neighborhood) and we were told there was a moratorium on building permits. It would be at least a year before we could build a house. So they don't want new businesses or new people. We decided to buy in Scarborough instead. :roll:

EJ
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

JREad

I mean in Portland Proper, not many exits have gas stations close to the exit. You have to go tooling around to find them.

First exit in Portland, is kind of crazy, but you can find gas near the train station, then going north, not a single exit has a station right off the exit.

South Bound, same thing.

Dont think like you know portland, think like a tourist or traveler.

EJ

Bruce Libby
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

Ahhhhhh!
What about all that hype and money spent years ago touting
the intersection of Park and Forest as "the gate way to city"
I thought that took care of all these issues?
Sorry ,that was only if one is looking for "Rocking Rickeys"!
Portland lost it when Bernal Allen hosed them good and got mall going
37 years ago! It has been a continual down hill slide since with one
costly attempt at liberal social engineering after another to no good end.
Bayside , actually ,Back Bay a gentirfied calm flat,should have been home to
one big WalMart, but then they wouldn't build where there wasn't free parking
and people actually wanted them!

Jonathan Read
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After Hooters, downtown activists eye shopping limits

you are right, its not a great plan in portland

but... getting off exit 5 you can find one quick getting off 6A you can find one right at the top of forest, and coming south bound getting off actually its 8 isn't it... (outer washington)

you can find one, but i agree the system is not the best planned..

SteveScharf
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This article about a favorite

This article about a favorite Portland Pizza place reminded me of the debacle we went through eight years ago at the end of Councilor Karen Geraghty’s term on the Portland City Council. Portland has probably the highest per capita of pizza places in America at this point. Interestingly, most of them are not national chains. Otto’s which is now growing to eight Portland Pie Company, and Pat’s Pizza are the only ones with more than two locations (someone is probably going to point out that this is wrong). There are Domino’s and Papa John’s on Outer Forest Avenue, but in town it is all locals and most of them are sit down restaurants as in the three aforementioned emporiums.

I thought it would be fun to revisit an old thread. There were several others related, but I wanted to highlight a couple of old timers including my friend Kate Bucklin who was fund to feed stories to when she was at The Forecaster.

I am surprised that I was not a contributor to this thread.

Steven Scharf
SCSMedia@aol.com

MaineBiz
JULY 25, 2014
Portland-based Otto Pizza launching eighth store

Otto Pizza, a Portland-based pizza chain founded in 2009, is opening its second location in South Portland this August, making it the company's eighth store in New England.

The pizza chain will open a 30-seat restaurant early next month at 125 John Roberts Rd., The Forecaster reported, according to a recently approved liquor license application.

The new location will be Otto's fourth in the greater Portland area. The pizza chain also has four spots in Massachusetts, including one in Boston and two in Cambridge.

Just five months after Otto opened its first restaurant in July 2009, the eatery had already reached its annual sales goal, the owners told Mainebiz at the time. They attributed the faster-than-expected sales to what they described as a simple and highly efficient formula, which partly consisted of their $3 price tag for individual slices and a laser-sharp focus on providing pizza — and not much else.

http://www.mainebiz.biz/article/20140725/NEWS0101/140729965/1092?utm_sou...

TheBollard.com
Hooters halted, Dunkin’ danglin’
November 21, 2006
Hooters halted, Dunkin’ danglin’
Formula biz limits pass, will be studied later
By Chris Busby

The Portland City Council effectively put the kibosh on plans to open a Hooters restaurant downtown. By a five-four vote, the Council approved a complex set of restrictions aimed at limiting the number, size and density of so-called “formula” restaurants and some types of retail businesses in the Old Port, Bayside and parts of downtown.

. . .

Likewise, the city ordinance to limit formula businesses quickly followed the announcement of plans to open a Hooters next to the Cumberland County Civic Center, on Free Street.

Hooters cannot open in the space currently occupied by The Stadium, a sports bar and restaurant, because it would be within 200 feet of another formula eatery, Margaritas Mexican Restaurant & Watering Hole, on Brown Street. According to its Web site, there are 19 Margaritas restaurants in New England – two in Portland.

. . .

In defense of the process that excluded the Planning Board, Cloutier said the formula zoning limits were “an economic regulation, not really a land-use [regulation].”

. . .

http://thebollard.com/2006/11/21/hooters-halted-dunkin-danglin/

This is a description of the ordinance enacted at 1:30 am at Councilor Karen Gerhergty’s last council meeting in November 2006 from The Bollard.

Formula biz ban a boondoggle
Big loopholes in proposed law to limit chains

. . .

• The Formula Business Ordinance would create two new zoning districts: a Formula Business Overlay Zone and an expanded Pedestrian Activities District Overlay Zone, or PAD Zone. . .

• In the Formula Business Overlay Zone, a business is considered a formula business if it shares “identical features,” such as décor or menu items, with 30 or more businesses within the United States. In the PAD Zone, a formula business is one with features identical to 10 or more domestic businesses.

• There could be no more than 23 formula businesses in the PAD Zone at any one time (an informal count put the current number of businesses meeting the PAD definition of “formula” at 23). There would be no cap in areas outside the PAD Zone.

• Any new formula business must be located at least 400 feet from any other formula business (as measured along the sidewalk between the two businesses’ main entrances) in the Formula Business Overlay Zone. In the PAD Zone, that distance can be no closer than 200 feet – unless the formula business would need a liquor license. In that case, in either zone, the main entrance of that business must be at least 150 feet from the main entrance of any other business, formula or not, with a liquor license.

• Formula restaurants are limited to 3,000 square feet of service area (not counting kitchen and storage space) in the Formula Business Overlay Zone, and formula retail businesses are limited to 4,000 square feet of “selling area” in that zone. In the PAD Zone, formula restaurants could have no more than 2,000 square feet of service area, and formula retail businesses no more than 1,500 square feet of “selling area.” In addition, in the PAD Zone, formula retail businesses and restaurants can have no more than 50 feet of “street frontage,” a limit not applicable in the larger Formula Business Overlay Zone.

Then there are the exceptions to this ordinance, of which there are not a few.

http://thebollard.com/2006/11/14/formula-biz-ban-a-boondoggle/

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