The Answer to Our Energy Problems; Cut the "Green Tape&

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BIW Worker
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The Answer to Our Energy Problems; Cut the "Green Tape&

quote:Originally posted by Al Greenlaw:
[b]Curtis: For the record I am absolutely in favor of drilling in ANWR or anywhere else that will:1. Reduce our dependence on foreign sources, and2. Lower our energy costs. [ 11-15-2002: Message edited by: Al Greenlaw ][/b]

No disrespect intended. Just looking for clarification. Anecdotally, I was talking to an oil rigger a while back. He said that there are oil fields right under the Gulf of Maine. Good luck getting to it through the sea of environmental red (green) tape, though.

BIW Worker
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The Answer to Our Energy Problems; Cut the "Green Tape&

The following is from the Lincoln Heritage InstituteThe Answer to Our Energy Problems; Cut the [color="green"]"Green Tape"
By U.S. Rep. Don Young (R-Alaska)
Energy transforms one material into another and creates power which is converted into motion and heat; thus, secure, abundant and inexpensive energy supplies are the cornerstone of a nation's economy and the key determinant of the standard of living enjoyed or endured, as the case may be, by a nation's population. World political stability will not be achieved until the standard of living in third world countries is raised. The world will require more energy even if industrialized countries make remarkable progress in reducing their energy consumption through more efficient energy use.
Does oil matter in the new "information" age? Will basic energy resources be necessary in the "new economy"? Energy is just as much a key to a thriving new economy as it is to the old "bricks and mortar" economy. The electricity necessary to move two megabytes of information over the internet requires burning about five ounces of oil or one pound of coal. A megabyte of information is the equivalent of a typical on-line transaction such as ordering a book from Amazon.com. The internet accounts for an estimated 8% of U.S. electricity consumption and is responsible for one-half to two-thirds of the current growth in U.S. demand for electricity.
Ample domestic energy resources exist to assure our nation's energy security. However, the potential of many of these resources cannot be realized because of restrictions demanded by environmental zealots. They oppose oil production, yet oil supplies 39 percent of our annual energy consumption, including 97 percent of all transportation fuels. They oppose natural gas production, yet natural gas supplies 23 percent of our annual energy consumption. They oppose coal production, yet coal supplies 23 percent of our annual energy consumption. They oppose nuclear power, even demanding that existing plants be closed, yet nuclear power supplies 8 percent of our annual energy consumption. They oppose hydroelectric power, even demanding the destruction of non-polluting hydroelectric dams, yet hydroelectric power supplies 4 percent of our annual energy consumption.
For an alternative to farther development of the energy sources providing 96 percent of our energy, environmental zealots propose technologies that are more costly or as yet unproven, glossing over their drawbacks, and unrealistic conservation measures. How is our country ever going to achieve energy security if we continue to listen to the zealots?
The United States must achieve energy security at a reasonable cost, or we will suffer economic paralysis and a greatly reduced standard of living. Energy security will require that we utilize the sources that supply 96 percent of our energy, including oil and gas, as well as develop and improve technology for utilizing alternative and renewable fuels at reasonable cost and improving energy efficiency.
Oil and natural gas provide about 62 percent of the energy Americans use, and future demand in the U.S. is projected to rise well into the foreseeable future. The U.S. Energy Information Agency forecasts that by 2020 domestic petroleum demand will increase 33 percent and natural gas demand will increase 62 percent, even after healthy increases in renewable energy supplies (26%) and energy efficiency (29%). The reason is that improvements in efficiency will be offset by higher energy demand in a robust, high technology economy.
However, as demand for energy to power our new high-tech economy has grown, domestic supply has not kept pace. The United States is experiencing a steep decline in oil production and critical shortages of natural gas. Presently, crude oil production averages about 5.8 million barrels per day - a rate not seen since the early 1950's. Meanwhile, increases in gas demand are outpacing production, which has fallen 14 percent since 1973. Increasingly frequent shortages and record high natural gas prices have resulted.
Is the United States running out of oil and natural gas? According to many geologists and petroleum engineers, future U.S. production of oil and gas will equal the amount that has been produced since the first well was drilled in 1859. They estimate that U.S. oil and gas resources (including proven reserves) are 204 billion barrels of oil and 1,295 trillion cubic feet of natural gas - enough to sustain a sizeable domestic oil and gas industry for more than 50 years.
Energy security does not require the U.S. be independent in oil and gas production. Energy security does demand use of our nation's substantial domestic energy sources; thereby, reducing oil demand from foreign oil cartels. Energy security requires the U.S. to develop an energy policy that prevents cartels from controlling short term oil prices by limiting oil supplies.
The United States has the ability to increase domestic oil supplies - and lower reliance on oil supplied at the whim of foreign governments. Domestic resources of oil are still substantial. One area which could supply a significant amount of domestic oil is Alaska's North Slope.
Alaska's North Slope is a good place to look for oil. It has supplied 20% of the country's domestic oil for the past 20 years. Some of the largest oil fields in the world are found there, including six of the top 20 U.S. oil fields with the highest reserves. The largest and second largest oil fields ever found in the United States, Prudhoe Bay (18th largest oil field in the world) and Kuparuk are on the North Slope.
The U.S. Geological Survey estimates that up to16 billion barrels of recoverable oil lie beneath a flat, nearly treeless, 1.5 million acre tract of Arctic desert in the easternmost part of the North Slope. This is enough oil to increase U.S. oil reserves by 72 percent and replace all imports from Saudi Arabia for the next 30 years. Less than 60 miles away, there is an existing pipeline which could carry additional million barrels of oil per day (about 10% of current U.S. daily imports). Development of this tract should be a critical component of an energy policy of guaranteeing U.S. energy security.
Unfortunately, the tract is within the 19 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), and Congressional approval is necessary before oil and gas development can proceed. Now, get ready for a surprise. Environmental zealots oppose oil development within this tract. They say development is a dire threat to the caribou herd. These same zealots predicted an environmental doomsday in the Far North if the Trans Alaska Pipeline was constructed. The pipeline would sink into the permafrost and break, spilling millions of barrels of oil over the tundra! Caribou herds would be decimated because they wouldn't cross the pipeline to go to their wintering areas!
Twenty-plus years of oil production have shattered the zealots' myths. Alaska's North Slope has produced more than 13 billion barrels of oil since 1977 without millions of barrels from a broken pipeline spilling over the tundra. Far from being decimated, the caribou herd has increased fivefold. Scientific studies show that populations, physiological health, and calving success of caribou have not been affected by responsible oil development.
Alaska North Slope oil development and conserving the Arctic environment are fully compatible - the record proves it. New drilling and seismic technology have reduced the footprint of development by almost 90 percent. More than 50 wells can now be drilled from one 6 to 7 acre pad. These wells are able to tap oil accumulations up to 5 miles away. Oil development on the North Slope is conducted under the world's strictest environmental and safety standards. Wildlife populations around production facilities are healthy and thriving. The same can't be said for many of the countries we rely upon for oil imports.
Let's rely on our own energy sources again, like oil resources in ANWR. Ignore the environmental zealots. They were wrong 25 years ago. They are wrong now. Let's develop a common sense policy to guarantee this nation's energy security. [URL=http://www.lincolnheritage.org/Articles[/URL][ 11-14-2002: Message edited by: BIW Worker ]

Doug Thomas
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Re: The Answer to Our Energy Problems; Cut the "Green T

Heat in 1 cord of wood=heat in 3 barrels of oil, and 90% of the money stays in Maine.

Al Greenlaw
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Re: The Answer to Our Energy Problems; Cut the "Green T

In an earlier post, I made a prediction that President Bush would get his Homeland Security Department, and that we would eventually drill in ANWR. The first part was realized this week, it is only a matter of time before we poke holes in Alaska. Al

No Compromises
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Re: The Answer to Our Energy Problems; Cut the "Green T

quote:Originally posted by Al Greenlaw:
[b]In an earlier post, I made a prediction that President Bush would get his Homeland Security Department, and that we would eventually drill in ANWR. The first part was realized this week, it is only a matter of time before we poke holes in Alaska. Al[/b]

Not sure whether or not you think drilling in Alaska is a good idea. As far as those who gibber about our "vanishing" resources, there is more oil under us than we could ever need. ANWR is just one example of that. That entire site under consideration is nothing more than a pinprick on the vast landscape that is Alaska.

Al Greenlaw
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Re: The Answer to Our Energy Problems; Cut the "Green T

Curtis: For the record I am absolutely in favor of drilling in ANWR or anywhere else that will:1. Reduce our dependence on foreign sources, and2. Lower our energy costs.
I also think it was a major mistake to remove hydro dams and to close Maine Yankee. If we had proceeded with the Dickey-Lincoln project Maine would be more competitive today. I love trees, animals, and fish, but I think we need to consider the human impact of our environmental policies. Al[ 11-15-2002: Message edited by: Al Greenlaw ]

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