Coyote Pack Kills Unarmed Woman

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Roger Ek
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Coyote Pack Kills Unarmed Woman

A pack of coyotes on Cape Breton Island killed a 19 year old folk singer from Toronto who was hiking in a national park on Cape Breton Island. The woman was unarmed. The hunting and trapping of coyotes is illegal in the park. It's a real education to read the comments following the article.

Link
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia/story/2009/10/28/ns-coyote-attack-d...

Mike G
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I believe a couple years ago

I believe a couple years ago a man in Maine was followed back to his truck by a pack of coyotes.

Interesting comments by Canadians on that link. Wonder if they have a bear baiting thread there somewhere?

Naran
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What a horrible, horrible way

What a horrible, horrible way to die. This incident should be sobering for residents of Cape Breton, considering it's not even winter yet, and other food shouldn't be that scarce.

Gaffer
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There will be more such

There will be more such stories as the bambi crowd treats these wild animals as fuzzy little pets. Wild animals are just that, and more coddling will only increase the risk.

JIMV
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Naran, more like sobering to

Naran, more like sobering to folk everywhere. We are creating a society where dangerous animals are routinely in populated areas. I remember a series of articles in the PPH years ago about those critters in Portland. In my world we have bears, wolves and mountain lions. In Canada they work very hard to insure folk in their parks are helpless prey.

The odd fellow getting eaten is the price society pays for political correctness.

Mike Travers
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JIMV, the only reason to have

JIMV, the only reason to have a gun is to kill yourself, other people or defenseless animals. For your safety and theirs we can't take the chance. For the next few years we'll let you hang onto them as long as you keep them locked, unloaded and out of reach, but eventually we'll come for them.

Sincerely,
The People Who Know What's Best For You

Economike
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The Econowife and I hiked

The Econowife and I hiked that same trail - on a very rainy day - just a few years ago. It's a well-traveled, open trail through a very remote, uninhabited region. The interior of that park consists of mile upon pathless mile of tangled black spruce scrub.

I've spent a lot of time alone in coyote country and have always found coyotes as shy as black bears.

Very strange. I can't help but wonder if the victim - knowingly or not - signalled encouragement to the coyotes.

Swaybar
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Horrible story however 2

Horrible story however 2 coyotes would be a pair...three or more are a pack :-}

Michelle Anderson
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This is all Bush's fault!

This is all Bush's fault!

JIMV
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"Very strange. I can't help

"Very strange. I can't help but wonder if the victim - knowingly or not - signalled encouragement to the coyotes."

I recently read a great book about mountain lions in Boulder Colorado...That is exactly what the police, wildlife officials, and greenies all said before the first person was killed...they got sort of quiet as the death count mounted.

Those animals are skittish because for a thousand years we shot them on sight...as we have not done that for a long time todays critter is far more likely to see Brandi as a snack and not a threat.

Naran
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The article also makes

The article also makes mention of possible rabies, etc. to account for the unexpected ferocity of the critters in Cape Breton. Frankly, I think that's just fishing for straws.

I think the critters recognized easy prey, and went for it.

Knives be damned.... I'd be packing a Glock.

Snowalker
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The only good coyote is a

The only good coyote is a dead coyote. In the North of Maine we had a pretty good handle on them with the snaring program but again the do gooders step in and make decisions about yet another thing they know nothing about...... there went was a good start at getting the deerherd up to numbers again. Now these same coyotes are moving in a southerly direction and now it's starting to affect the beautiful people and their own little critters.....soon their kids....an occasional jogger.....even some old sot out enjoying his property on a Sunday afternoon during hunting season.
What goes around, Comes around.................enjoy

LMD
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Economike wrote: Very

Economike wrote:
Very strange. I can't help but wonder if the victim - knowingly or not - signalled encouragement to the coyotes.

Couple of things come to mind (I'm no coyote expert, but have some experience with them)...
First one is - and opinions among hunters, animal behaviorists, researchers, and wildlife experts vary wildly about this:
~The victim was a young female. I'm from the 'old school of thought' that suggests that the 'scent' of a female, in particular during menses, may attract predators; also male ungulates in rut. I was taught this eons ago, and although I've read the research 'pros and cons' on the subject, I've always kept this in mind when dealing with animals, wild or domestic. Coyote have an extremely developed sense of smell. Again, it might have been a possibility and certainly I have no knowledge about this victim's physiological status at the time of the attack.

Second, she was hiking alone. Yes, there were other hikers who came upon the scene, but she was by herself. There is truly safety in numbers, especially if you are unarmed. She could have been viewed as easy prey. She looks very petite in the pictures I've seen of her in other reports. If she (understandably) screamed in a high-pitched voice, it may have triggered a further predator response.

Third, is it possible that she happened across a portion of the trail that was 'relatively' near a kill made by the coyote? Or, were they in pursuit of a 'kill' at the time of the attack?
I've had two experience that convinced me that coyote, when in pursuit of food are not too bothered by the presence of humans.
We lived on the outskirts of Phoenix at a time when that area was still 'remote'; desert and foothills. Had a parcel of land fenced and gated, but easily accessed by coyote. Our poultry were housed in predator-proof areas at night, but had access to graze near the house during the day. Was standing on my porch one early morning watching my geese which were about 5 feet from me. A female coyote came streaking across the yard honed in on one of them. She didn't see me. I lunged towards her and the geese. When she sighted me, she momentarily froze in her tracks, then did a 180 and left at lightening speed. Anyone who knows geese know they make excellent 'watchdogs'. What was surprising about this incident was the geese didn't even sound their usual 'alert' as they normally do when a predator is close by. I figured since it was coyote whelping season, she was looking for some quick and easy prey for her pups and was on 'a mission'.

The second incident was when we lived in northern California on a remote Army base. The base had 'garden plots' which were made available for folk to grow their own produce. It wasn't uncommon to go out to water your garden at dusk and have a couple of coyote streak by going after jackrabbit. They were unfazed by out presence, focusing solely on their next meal.

Regardless of all my 'ponderings', I can't imagine the fear and pain this young woman went through during this attack. I'm so sorry for her friends and family who have lost her.

LMD
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Snowalker, good to see you

Snowalker, good to see you posting :)

Economike
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Knives be damned.... I'd be

Knives be damned.... I'd be packing a Glock.

Naran -

Good luck getting into Canada with a handgun.

LMD -

I think your ideas have a lot of merit. I can't claim a lot of experience with coyotes either, but I have faced a few predator animals in the wild - bears, cats, fishers, and coyotes. My intuition is that an animal gets a sense of a human's confidence - if you can stand straight and stare it down, you're home free. Knock on wood.

I'm imagining, perhaps without justification, a young woman who encounters a wild animal and thinks "Isn't this cool? Nice doggie!" and perhaps tries to make interspecies contact with a granola bar.

johnw
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As usual it is the humans

As usual it is the humans fault..... 2 summers ago in Alaska I was 30 feet off shore on the Russian river fishing when a "friendly" grizzly walked up with in 30 feet of me........ as I and a couple of fellow fisherman followed the correct procedure for "shooing" a bear away I wondered to myself hmmmmm is this the same bear that tore the kids face off two weeks ago right here?????? Bottom line you never know what a wild animal is going to do.. the so called "experts" don't know either.
But for me it comes down to a human life or an animals I'll always pick the human, unless it''s a liberal.Then we can see how that dialogue theory works out.
I wish that young woman had been packing a firearm...... but then again you are in Canada.

Mike G
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LMD I'm fairly convinced that

LMD

I'm fairly convinced that deer are less afraid of women than men and mostly because of scent. My wife who hunts has had good success, often times bucks will approach her, when it is obvious that they see her.

I can't say that has ever happened to me.

apondsong
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Coyotes do not seek to kill

Coyotes do not seek to kill humans. They play an important role in the healthy balance of nature. And the lack of sane (Maine) hunting laws of this beautiful and intelligent animal is beyond reprehensible.

The deer were not put here for the only purpose of feeding humans and their egos...we do the healthy balance of nature a grave injustice if we think solely in those terms; ergo: "the only coyote is a dead one".

Man kills for "fun", "food" and/or "ego". Coyotes kill deer for food, and they, by nature, go for the weaker and sickly...insuring a stronger and healthy herd; supporting a genetically sounder group as a whole. It is not uncommon for man, however, to kill the stronger, larger, and most healthy. It feeds the ego, but does nothing for the betterment of the species. In fact, it weakens it.

The basic staples of the diet of a coyote are: mice, voles, rats, rabbits, birds, fruit and berries of all kinds, insects of all manner, and carrion. Deer may be taken, but they will be the smaller, wounded, or weaker ones almost every time. To do otherwise would put them in too much danger of injury and death. A coyote in the winter needs to conserve energy as much as any animal...including deer. It is a matter of life and death.

If Snowalker perfers to live "up North" that's fine with me. It's not fine with me that he thinks he has a right to take the life of any animal, any time, that he doesn't like and that might feed on deer meat. If the snow is deep, and a deer is killed to feed a coyote family....that's the way of nature. Leave it be.

It's just plain WRONG to have no closed season on these animals. It's just WRONG to allow them to be chased by dogs with electronic radio collars while the killers wait for the poor animal to be run down, savaged by hounds, ripped apart, or shot. The killers watch the progress of the "hunt" on hand-held monitors...often standing by the side of the road. It's not hunting; it's killing. It goes on all year long, non-stop; during the time of birthing and raising pups and during brutal winter days and nights. A beautiful animal..so like our dogs...who lives in famlies and if left alone wishes only to live the life it has been given..does not deserve this.

When did we lose the respect for the animals we choose to hunt here in Maine? When did it become "fun" to put hounds on another so like the dog that is chasing it, and revel in the shooting of that animal or of its being torn apart? That isn't hunting...it's killing. And it's a shamefull thing to do to any animal.

There is a reason why this attack happened; it is NOT normal coyote behavior....and I'd bet the farm we humans had a part in it. I'm not blaming the victim...but I think there are underlying reasons for sure...more than mensteral cycles.... Just off-hand I suspect people tried to "tame" the animals by leaving out food for them...something in that vein. Always a bad idea all the way around.

THIS, is a topic I care deeply about. There is never a reason for torture or suffing of another animal...our laws need to change. Enough said.

Naran
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Nobody tortured or baited

Nobody tortured or baited these coyotes. The rangers just shot dead whichever ones they could find after the critters ripped a young woman's throat out.

Economike
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Just off-hand I suspect

Just off-hand I suspect people tried to "tame" the animals by leaving out food for them...something in that vein.

I'm familiar with this area. The nearest campground is miles away from the trailhead, and nearest permanent human habitation even further.

Except possibly for tourists' litter, it strikes me as doubtful that anyone would have fed (or even have seen) coyotes along this trail.

JIMV
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Quote:The basic staples of

[quote]The basic staples of the diet of a coyote are: mice, voles, rats, rabbits, birds, fruit and berries of all kinds, insects of all manner, and carrion.[/quote]

and the odd tourist and folk singer

FXSTC
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They need to consume more of

They need to consume more of our turkey population.

johnw
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Apondsong you really haven't

Apondsong you really haven't spent much time in the woods...... and why don't you add domestic dogs and cats to this beautiful creatures diet......And some starry evening you might enjoy the wonderful "song" of coyotes as they chase down a deer as it breaks through the crust.... and go out and see where they've torn its guts out such a clean and merciful death . Maybe you ought to travel into a deer yard when a pack of them has gotten in in the deep snow........ah the natural beauty of it all.....

Bob MacGregor
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This was a horrible event,

This was a horrible event, but why add the word "unarmed" to the title? Had there been a law in place allowing people to carry firearms at this park, would the woman who was attacked have been armed?

Roger Ek
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The reason she died was not

The reason she died was not that the coyotes were hungry. The reason she died was that she was unarmed. That fact is the sole cause of her death. It's always entertaining to read the posts of apondsong and the other environmentalists here who live in a dream world. We have a whole nation of them to our north. I worked in Canada for 7 years. One of the mills I visited wanted to hire me. I told them I could not take the job. They wondered why and I told them the first time I walked into a hardware store with a .357 Magnum on my hip they would call out the national guard.

johnw
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Apondsong..... unfortunately

Apondsong..... unfortunately I have other things to attend to today so I couldn't spend the whole day at my deer stand....... which is on my property which I leave open to the public to hunt , snowmobile, hike and ATV on bidrd watch and generally enjoy .......but I said to myself hmmmmm If I don't see a deer this morning maybe one of those frigging coyotes whose scat I see full of deer hair will wander by and I can put a hole in it....... but alas duty called.
Just another little aside I suspect that you are one of those hysterical anti-gunners as well .... I can't tell you how much I savor the FREEDOM to grab my rifle and walk out my front door and go hunting or just target practicing... without any additional BS from the antigun lobby's attempts to violate MY second amendment rights.
Everytime I read a post from someone like you I double my efforts to convince others about how incredibly wrong your side is......... and I get converts......

apondsong
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johnw..... I'm sorry you are

johnw..... I'm sorry you are so angry. And I'm sorry you make assumptions about others without knowing them. I wish it were different for you on both counts. Let me tell you a little bit about myself as you have inadvertently shared some of yourself with me.

I also own land....nearly 100 acres of forest, fields, woods, brook, ponds and swamp. There is a 10 acre beaver pond right out my back door from which I derive my "handle". I have seen every manner of Maine wildlife where I live...except a black bear. I have hunted since high school...what I call real hunting (not simply kiling): deer, patridge, phesant, and woodcock. My father's hunting ethics were not always the best...I did what I learned until I grew older, and a bit more "sure" from my own experiences and personal standards.

I allow all non-hunters access to my property who travel via foot I give access permission to hunters every year at deer season who I know are responsible sportsmen. I do not allow ATV or snowmobile access, as there are plenty of trails in the area to accomodate them, as is. I do not permit trapping or hounding.

Coyotes are not decimating our deer herds, John. You can choose to ignore that fact, but it is a fact. And if you enjoy killing an animal for the sake of killing it....then that's your choice. I can only hope that more people try to take the time to learn about this beautiful animal...so dog-like, the Native Americans called it, God's Song Dog. They have their place in the scheme of things...and we would all do well to be a bit more humble to the wiser ways of nature, and give respect and gratitude to all the four-leggeds ( and two ) that walk among us. Hunting isn't the issue; neither is your right to own and carry a firearm...I support both.

So, next time you read a post from "someone like you" (me)....please don't assume you know everything about them...same with the coyote. We need to do better by them, and I would welcome further, hopefully respectfull, dialogue with you. 'pond'

Mike G
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apondsong I'd say the

apondsong

I'd say the majority of hunters in Maine, hunt for food as the basic premise of the hunt, especially deer hunters, so we must be as beloved to you as the coyotes.

Stephen Carmichael
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The dogs in this incident now

The dogs in this incident now have a taste for human flesh and should be destroyed.

johnw
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Apondsong..... I hunt because

Apondsong..... I hunt because I enjoy being outside... and enjoy eating what I kill...........I'm happy that i was wrong in assuming that you are an anti -gunner but you are still very wrong about coyotes . Have You ever seen one walking across a field with a new born fawn in it's mouth? . Angry , no just tired of the left wing bs that is taking this country down and I refuse to be cowed or silenced by them. PS I've seen lots of bears and come pretty much nose to nose with them on a few occasions ... i wouldn't shoot one or bait one...but neither would I deny someone else the right to do so.
Coyotes are not gentle and dog like creautres......One of the few times I have ever been truly frightened in the woods is at the end of a winter day when I was logging in NH ,walking a out across a clear cut and seeing two coyotes following my my track on the other side...... close enough for me.

Naran
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According to the original

According to the original articles on this incident, the wardens are doing exactly that, in hunting down and killing any coyotes in the immediate area.

It's sad, but on the other hand, was this young (human) woman's life worth less than one of them?

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