Monsanto Conspires with EPA to Convince Everyone that Roundup Isn't Carcinogenic

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anonymous_coward
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Monsanto Conspires with EPA to Convince Everyone that Roundup Isn't Carcinogenic

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-03-14/court-docs-prove-monsanto-collu...

Way more interesting than a 12 year old tax return. It isn't paranoia if they really are out to get you....

Tom C
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Reaching.

Reaching.

mainemom
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Okay, @anon, you had a career

Okay, @anon, you had a career in a science field.
Please react to the criticism that the studies on the safety of Roundup have been studies on the safety of its active ingredient, glyphosate.
I'm not a scientist, but I would say, well duh! That's what we need to know: what's the likelihood that glyphosate causes cancer in human beings (when used as instructed)?

anonymous_coward
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The active ingredient is the

The active ingredient is the ingredient that performs the primary purpose of the compound, it doesn't mean that 1) other ingredients are not carcinogenic; 2) there isn't an interaction between ingredients that changes how the interact with the body. Considering how much money Roundup makes, you would think they could afford to do a proper test.

What's concerning here is that 1) Monsanto offered to "ghost write" the toxicity section and then have independent scientists sign off on it; 2) they called in a favor to kill the regulatory review to get it passed through.

Rebecca
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AC, Just out of curiosity,

AC, Just out of curiosity, Do you have a pesticides license?

ps: These are NOT handed out like hunting licenses AND they require and ongoing education credit system to keep them.

Roger Ek
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Time to stock up on Roundup.

Time to stock up on Roundup. It is highly effective on poison ivy. I know somebody who is highly allergic to Poison Ivy. He learned the hard way to never burn poison ivy. He breathed some of the smoke and it nearly got him. I have used Roundup on poison ivy. It lasted ten years until it began to reappear. This spring I'll reapply.

The sap from poison Ivy is quite oily. Do not mow it. The sap spatters as it comes out the discharge chute and the next time you need to service the mower you get it on yourself. This is true for the smallest weed eater type trimmer on up to the largest Diesel powered bush hogs like the heavy duty Brush Bull I use. Sooner or later you will need to service the equipment. It is much better to use Roundup than to mow poison ivy. Rural people know what works. They have seen it work. You can still find herbicides and pesticides that work, even if you don't see them on hardware store shelves any more.

Ugenetoo
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Roger

Roger
Roundup does not persist in the environment. Your success with killing the poison ivey is due to the chemical translocating directly to the root where it kills it quite effectively.
Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup is completely broken down within two days of application by soil microbes and sunlight.
I've used it many times to eradicate hard to kill weeds such as crabgrass and witchgrass immediately before tilling for other crops.
A little secret to using glyphosate is to add a couple tablespoons of laundry detergent to your mix when you put it in the handsprayer.
It helps break the surface tension on the leaf, allowing the chemical to penetrate and move to the roots.

Roger Ek
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Good to know, Ugenetoo. There

Good to know, Ugenetoo. There is still good info on AMG if you have the patience to wade through the slime.

Bobby Reynolds
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Roundup works on just about

Roundup works on just about everything. The one plant it doesn't seem to kill is bamboo. I've sprayed it in almost full strength in the Spring when the shoots are small; all it seems to do is retard the growth. Any suggestions?

anonymous_coward
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"Roundup works on just about

"Roundup works on just about everything. The one plant it doesn't seem to kill is bamboo. I've sprayed it in almost full strength in the Spring when the shoots are small; all it seems to do is retard the growth. Any suggestions?"

FIRE

anonymous_coward
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@Rebecca: "AC, Just out of

@Rebecca: "AC, Just out of curiosity, Do you have a pesticides license?"

No, but I don't want cancer.

Look, I have a degree in atmospheric sciences, and that doesn't help my credibility WRT global warming here. I'm not sure how a pesticides license would help with that!

Ugenetoo
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A pesticide license might

A pesticide license might help you to understand how these chemicals actually work, and why they don't pose a risk.

Bobby.
You might try the soap trick.
As I recall, bamboo has a very waxy exterior that may be repelling the glyphosate.
It needs to be taken in through the leaf in order for it to get to the roots.
You might also try adding a little N to the mix as the faster the plant is growing, the faster the chemical is taken in.

Tom C
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Roundup works on just about

Roundup works on just about everything. The one plant it doesn't seem to kill is bamboo. I've sprayed it in almost full strength in the Spring when the shoots are small; all it seems to do is retard the growth. Any suggestions?

Japanese bamboos is vicious and I've waged many battles with the stuff over the years. The only thing I've done that works is to hit hard with Roundup on the leaves when it blossoms late summer/fall, that seems to be it's most vunerable time. Hit it often and hard, make sure you get some on each leaf.

Next year it will be much less, and hit it again when it blossoms. Keep doing each year it until there isn't any left - even a few shoots will turn back into a jungle in a few years unless controlled or wiped out.

Bobby Reynolds
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Thanks. I will try that. I

Thanks. I will try that. I usually hit it in the spring when it is just starting to break out of the ground; I've never tried it later in the year. As for fire, that doesn't work (someone suggested that earlier). The old bamboo burns nicely but the new crop seems to enjoy a freshly burned off seed bed. It's pervasive stuff, to say the least.

mainemom
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@anon

@anon
There is one sure way to avoid getting cancer:

Tom C
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Thanks. I will try that. I

Thanks. I will try that. I usually hit it in the spring when it is just starting to break out of the ground; I've never tried it later in the year. As for fire, that doesn't work (someone suggested that earlier). The old bamboo burns nicely but the new crop seems to enjoy a freshly burned off seed bed. It's pervasive stuff, to say the least.

If you hit the shoots and young plants, those will grow in crazy ways, but won't kill the plant. Anything above ground, fire, cutting, etc, doesn't stop it, it is a root-based plant, and can generate an extensive interconnected root system. I tried digging it up, but even a 1-inch piece of root left in the ground will generate another plant.

For whatever reason, getting it at flowering time seems to send the poison right down into the roots where it needs to be killed. I'll spray it a few times, a few days apart or every week or so for a few weeks, and make sure I get every leaf. The leaves will eventually die and fall off, but not before they send the poison down. The next year the crop will be quite a bit less. Keep hitting it over the next few years until it's gone, and then you should still keep an eye on the area for new growth.

It is a very persistent plant.

anonymous_coward
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@Ugenetoo: "A pesticide

@Ugenetoo: "A pesticide license might help you to understand how these chemicals actually work, and why they don't pose a risk."

If they're so safe, then, why didn't they just go through the regular process of testing and use regulatory capture to skirt the system? It's not like they can't afford it!

Jasper
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News flash, Roger: you are

News flash, Roger: you are the slime.

Ugenetoo
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If they're so safe, then, why

If they're so safe, then, why didn't they just go through the regular process of testing and use regulatory capture to skirt the system? It's not like they can't afford it!

Those eeeeevil corporations that have come up with the inovations that are feeding the 7.5 billion souls of the world?
Is that who you mean?

Glyphosate has been around since 1974 and every whackjob pseudo scientist, organic food advocate, and chicken little alarmist has come out with a "study" proving that Roundup causes everything from the heartbreak of Psoriasis to genital warts.
Yet, it is still sold over the counter with no restrictions in nearly every state of the union.

Rebecca
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For the bamboo....... Try

For the bamboo....... Try this, get some high nitrogen fertilizer. 50# bag(s) 46-00-00 also known as urea. Pour straight from bag into container of water and cover. Let set for 7 - 10 days. Pour directly onto bamboo. The high nitrogen burns away the micro hairs on the roots thus depriving the plant of the nutrients to survive. Do this in dry weather. Rain dissipates the nitrogen and will dilute it to the point of normal conditions. Use ONLY in small () areas.

Overuse will cause nitrogen runoff which is damaging to aquatic life through magnification of algae in standing waters.
THIS is why a pesticides license is useful. While Urea is not classified as a pesticide. It can sometimes do the job more effectively than many others. July /August is the appropriate time to try this. Let us know your results.

anonymous_coward
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@Ugenetoo: "Yet, it is still

@Ugenetoo: "Yet, it is still sold over the counter with no restrictions in nearly every state of the union."

Cigarettes are carcinogenic and are sold over the counter in every state, too..

That's not the point - the point is to understand the degree of it's carcinogenicity, and how it interacts with the body.

All I'm asking is, why don't they just adhere to the laws as they are written?

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