O'Reilly socks it to newspaper columnists

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mediadog
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O'Reilly socks it to newspaper columnists

Bill O'Reilly nailed it in a speech to newspaper columnists over the weekend when he told a hostile audience that content as well as competition from the internet was responsible for the continuing dramatic drop in newspaper circulation.

[i]...O'Reilly said newspapers have a dismal future and also criticized a writer in the audience during a speech Friday at the National Society of Newspaper Columnists (NSNC) conference.

"Newspapers are dying, and there are two reasons why," said the Fox News host and Creators Syndicate newspaper columnist. "One reason is the Internet. The other is ideology." [/i]

[url=http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/news/article_display.jsp?vnu_con... Editor & Publisher story[/url]

It's a fact that newspaper content has increasingly been a turn off for readers whose politics are right of center. Editorial pages -- in Maine as well as elsewhere -- are run by liberal editors. Most news columnists have political views ranging from left to far-left. Newspaper, wire service and television news staffs are filled, bottom to top, with liberals and their attitude spills heavily into how news stories are written and displayed.

I can't discern whether O'Reilly said or whether the E&P writer interjected a comment about publishers and managers being somewhat more conservative. If that is true, it is only marginally so.

Here in Maine, one publisher openly brags about steering his influential paper to the left. Another is a sizeable contributor to the Democratic Party. And their papers continue to move farther and farther away from the center. To stretch a point, I find this especially ironic because if the Islamists were to triumph, these capitalists would be among their first victims.

For the most part, IMO, O'Reilly was right on target. But perhaps he should have praised these columnists instead of scolding them. After all, how many in his Fox News cable audience of more than 4 million have been driven there by anger over what they read in their daily papers?

Tom C
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O'Reilly socks it to newspaper columnists

This is something the newspapers have been in such denial about for so long - it is necessary to get in thier faces and tell them time and time again until they figure it out.

Melvin Udall
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O'Reilly socks it to newspaper columnists

There are none so blind as those who cannot see.

Tom C
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O'Reilly socks it to newspaper columnists

Man, look at the lame retorts by the reporters. These guys are as bad as the tripe they write.

Roger Ek
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O'Reilly socks it to newspaper columnists

Back around 1994 some board members of Unorganized Territoried United met with the editiorial board of the Bangor Daily News. We were aghast at the ignorance of the BDN editorial board regarding matters of importance to rural Maine. I don't know if they were just dumb or simply playing dumb.

mediadog
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O'Reilly socks it to newspaper columnists

BTW, O'Reilly's column does not appear, as far as I know, on the editorial pages of any Maine newspaper, despite being one of the livelier writers in the business.

Maine editors, when looking for conservative national columnists, appear to select the dullest they can find. No Charles Krauthammer and certainly no O'Reilly. They are a couple of columnists who are not afraid to inform the liberal king-makers of their nakedness.

Michael Vaughan
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Re: O'Reilly socks it to newspaper columnists

[quote]
Here in Maine, one publisher openly brags about steering his influential paper to the left. Another is a sizeable contributor to the Democratic Party...[/quote]
I'd say virtually all of them have, through their overt bias, made massive "in-kind" contributions worth millions of dollars.

Somebody with a Nexux Lexus subscription could probably come up with a good pro-majority story analysis and measured by the advertising rate per column-inch, calculate a fairly good set of estimates for the ethics commission.

Bob Stone
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O'Reilly socks it to newspaper columnists

I have long held the view that Maine newspapers (dailies) are committing corporate suicide. Thier leftist ideology blinds them.

1. They back leftist causes and candidates.

2. The leftists get elected.

3. The leftists raise taxes.

4. People move out.

5. Subscriptions fall.

That is corporate suicide.

mediadog
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O'Reilly socks it to newspaper columnists

Having written the post at the top of this thread, I looked at my Portland Press Herald this morning with extra care. And right away, I found a good example of the kind of liberal media thinking that engenders mistrust and sends conservatives to the new or alternative media.

On page 1 is this headline over a story on the Supreme Court:

[b]Justices shift to right in three rulings[/b]

How would this headline read if the court had moved leftward? Can anybody envision a headline that said "Justices move to the left." Of course not. No way. The issues in each of the cases were considerably more complex than simple left or right. But the media mindset is that any decisions deemed overly conservative must be underlined -- and labeled. The PH display is an excellent example.

Also on page 1 was the story of a soldier with Maine connections killed in Iraq. I personally feel the story of this hero belongs on the front page, but I have doubts about the motivation of those who placed it there. The paper's recent editorial stands have fired the suspicion (paranoid as it may be) that any bad news from Iraq is good news for the PH.

On the op-ed page is a touching column by a Portland police officer about the type of tragedy that occurs all too often close to home. One figure stuck out: More than 6,000 teenagers are killed each year on U.S. highways. That is about twice the number killed in action during the entire five years of war in Iraq.

But domestic accident stories, even when they occur right here in Maine, rarely have political elements that stir liberal editors so they are too often are relegated to lesser spaces. No wonder conservative as well as apolitical readers are increasingly turning elsewhere for their news.

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