The other side of "Right of Return"

17 posts / 0 new
Last post
Vikingstar
Offline
Last seen: 11 hours 56 min ago
Joined: 01/04/2003 - 1:01am
The other side of "Right of Return"

http://www.americanthinker.com/2008/03/the_right_of_return_and_the_fo.html

"On March 19, 2008, a group of Jewish representatives addressed the United Nations Human Rights Council to present The Case for Rights and Redress on behalf of refugees caused by the Arab-Israeli conflicts. These are not the ones who hold the title of "refugees for the longest period of time in recorded history" and who have been supported by UNRWA welfare in "refugee camps" for the past sixty years. No, the U.N. address was for Justice for Jewish Refugees from Arab Countries, the 850,000 Jews who were expelled from their homes in Arab lands. The report refers to documents recently uncovered in UN archives that "reveal a pattern of state-sanctioned oppression that precipitated the mass exodus of Jews from 10 Arab countries."

MickeyH
Offline
Last seen: 3 years 1 month ago
Joined: 05/12/2005 - 12:01am
The other side of "Right of Return"

Great post Vikingstar!

I guess it's a non-event to the anti-Israel crowd here on AMG?

Vikingstar
Offline
Last seen: 11 hours 56 min ago
Joined: 01/04/2003 - 1:01am
The other side of "Right of Return"

Let's give them a chance; this is not well-known information.

Economike
Offline
Last seen: 3 hours 9 min ago
Joined: 11/28/2006 - 9:09am
The other side of "Right of Return"

Actually, this is well-known information. At least it's freely accessible information.

I think that this example illustrates, by contrast, what I choose to call the "sore loser" bias underlying the use of historical grievance in advancing claims to rights or preferences.

History is an unending story of conflict and displacement; there are few societies - if any - that don't occupy territory to which some other group (or groups) have a putative claim, nor are there any societies which haven't suffered some atrocity inflicted by another.

"Remember the Battle of the Boyne" was, until recently, a graffito one could see sprayed on walls in Northern Ireland. That a disaffected group like Sinn Fein could nurse its resentment over a three-centuries-past event is a sign of the brittle and insubstantial relevance of its claims in the here-and-now. This is what I mean by the "sore loser" aspect of historical grievance; it functions as a sort of psychological compensation for a lack of purpose in the present. The pursuit of historical grievance against accomplished fact is often an exercise in reactionary futility. For example, Islam Rampant.

The group of Jewish representatives presenting the case for rights and redress were making a cogent rhetorical point, but I'm sure that none of the affected refugees organize their lives around an obsession to punish the perpetrators of their injuries, injuries soon to be lost to living memory. I'm confident that these refugees are not among history's "sore losers."

History is instructive and continuous but, in my view, attempts to apportion responsibility among the various actors in the Middle East on the basis of past injuries - factual or fictive - are futile.

Andrew Ian Dodge
Offline
Last seen: 4 years 4 months ago
Joined: 12/12/1999 - 1:01am
The other side of "Right of Return"

I have mentioned the disposed Jews from Arab countries in discussions with those who go on about Palestinians and "their rights." Some are shocked there is such a thing and other just suggest that Jews have enough money that they don't need to be compensated or allowed to the right to return.

francisz
Offline
Last seen: 4 years 9 months ago
Joined: 03/10/2005 - 1:01am
The other side of "Right of Return"

I think the misguided attempts at retroactive re-apportion are worse than futile – I think they feed the Palestinian victim complex and perpetuate the historic anti-Semitism that has threatened the very existence of Israel since 1948. I do agree with Economike's ‘sore-loser’ analysis – and I think today we err on the side of ‘no hard feelings’ as opposed to ‘you lost, get over it’. It is a shame, because losers who do not get over it, but instead persist in acts that characterize their desperation – acts of ignobility, acts of terrorism, acts of negation – are regressive, and a threat to progressive humanity (the winners).

I also agree that he group of Jewish representatives who present the case for rights and redress make a cogent rhetorical point: a point that illustrates very well the irrational and ultimately self-limiting call for reversibility: there is no such thing in this world where there is no precondition of stasis and no inalienable right to historical vindication.

Andrew Ian Dodge
Offline
Last seen: 4 years 4 months ago
Joined: 12/12/1999 - 1:01am
The other side of "Right of Return"

bump

Vikingstar
Offline
Last seen: 11 hours 56 min ago
Joined: 01/04/2003 - 1:01am
The other side of "Right of Return"

One more bump, just for fun and giggles...

MickeyH
Offline
Last seen: 3 years 1 month ago
Joined: 05/12/2005 - 12:01am
The other side of "Right of Return"

Bumping for fun.

I'm surprised Alan Toth hasn't chimed in on this one

pmconusa
Offline
Last seen: 2 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 04/20/2000 - 12:01am
The other side of "Right of Return"

These people are certainly entitled to compensation for their unlawfully taken property but why would you want to go back to somewhere you are not welcome? I might add that their chance of getting it are about the same as me winning the lottery. The State of Israel welcomes all Jews and provides significant assistance to those who cannot afford the cost of resettlement.

MickeyH
Offline
Last seen: 3 years 1 month ago
Joined: 05/12/2005 - 12:01am
The other side of "Right of Return"

[quote] The State of Israel welcomes all Jews and provides significant assistance to those who cannot afford the cost of resettlement.[/quote]

Actually PMCON the State of Israel welcomes ALL regardless of religious beliefs. Just like the USA

Vikingstar
Offline
Last seen: 11 hours 56 min ago
Joined: 01/04/2003 - 1:01am
The other side of "Right of Return"

I think that the ultimate point is to remind the world that there were as many Jews displaced by the actions of the Arabs as there were Arabs displaced by the actions of the, umm, Arabs (as well as Jews). Instread of absorbing the refugees into their societies, the Arabs have used their refugees as a weapon agaisnt the Jews.

francisz
Offline
Last seen: 4 years 9 months ago
Joined: 03/10/2005 - 1:01am
The other side of "Right of Return"

As many Jews? Actually, more. If, according to the UN estimate in 1949 that there were 700,000 displaced Palestinians who now number around 4.5 million claimants, there should be a correlating increase among the displaced Jews, who were estimated at 850,000.

So, as the AT article concludes: “If there is an "inalienable right of return," then the price tag for the Arabs states will be hefty. I think Israel could be convinced to settle for a five-fold increase in land and $300 billion restitution.”

Let’s talk.

Economike
Offline
Last seen: 3 hours 9 min ago
Joined: 11/28/2006 - 9:09am
The other side of "Right of Return"

A little-known aspect of the historic [url=http://www.genealogytoday.com/ca/connect/030806.html]Acadian diaspora[/url] was the unwillingness of the Quebec government to receive the Acadian refugees.

If this resettlement had occurred the lingering story of English ethnic cleansing would be quite different and, in all likelihood, less infamous. While there is little doubt that the expulsion of the Acadians was a cruelty perpetrated by the English, the lingering sense of historical grievance that arose from the event was very much influenced by the subsequent failure of the French authorities.

Why would Quebec refuse to accept other Francophone colonists? The answer lies in the rigid nature of Quebec governance and society - the static nature of New France's economy, its dependence on the mother country for economic support, its suspicion of Huguenot sympathies among the Acadians - which led to the perception that an influx of refugees would be a burden instead of an opportunity, even though New France's population was a small fraction of the English colonies. (As an aside, one irony of history is that the English colonies benefitted economically far more from French settlement - in the form of Huguenot refugees - than than did the French colonies.)

This example illuminates a neglected aspect of the Palestinian refugee "problem." Why, after sixty years, is it a problem at all? Part of the answer surely lies in the nature of those societies claiming kinship with the Palestinians, whose rigid social structures and lack of economic dynamism preclude them from offering more than token gestures and armaments.

Ironically, the Palestinians who aren't problem refugees are Israeli citizens.

Andrew Ian Dodge
Offline
Last seen: 4 years 4 months ago
Joined: 12/12/1999 - 1:01am
The other side of "Right of Return"

[i]As an aside, one irony of history is that the English colonies benefitted economically far more from French settlement - in the form of Huguenot refugees - than than did the French colonies.[/i]

That is probably less irony and more divine retribution considering it was the French who so mercilessly drove the Huguenots out of their country.

Economike
Offline
Last seen: 3 hours 9 min ago
Joined: 11/28/2006 - 9:09am
The other side of "Right of Return"

I can't say whether the retribution was divine, AID, but that's an excellent point.

It occurs to me that Huguenot diaspora also serves as an example of how refugees who possess human capital and seek out opportunity for social mobility don't become history's "sore losers."

francisz
Offline
Last seen: 4 years 9 months ago
Joined: 03/10/2005 - 1:01am
The other side of "Right of Return"

Now you,ve done it, AID: we were hoping to leave Divinity out of the question at hand, or else all hell breaks out.

Log in to post comments