Quaker Influences On The Constitution

5 posts / 0 new
Last post
Stephen Carmichael
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 5 months ago
Joined: 06/19/2008 - 8:05pm
Quaker Influences On The Constitution

A cool link on Quaker history

“When the Founding Fathers met in the latter part of the 1700's to write the Constitution that would design the government of the United States, they turned to William Penn's Frame of Government for Pennsylvania. If they had turned to Puritan New England for their model there would have been an established state church. If they had turned to aristocratic Virginia for their model there would have been a privileged class. Most of the rights and freedoms that we take for granted as a part of our way of life in America today were originally set forth in Penn's Charter of Liberties for his colony. Friends were the original architects of the free society that we enjoy.”

The Quakers endured persecution in the New World and the not so Friendly Puritans of Massachusetts saw fit to hang a few of them in the Commons, but this horrible tale lead to the William Penn prototype of a free society.

I'm interested in this nugget of history that later plays out again when the Maine Constituion is drafted.

So how is this relevant to the religion section of AMG? I can attempt to tie the Quaker model of government that hade heavy religious faith to one section of the Constitution of Maine.

Article I Section 2. Power inherent in people. All power is inherent in the people; all free governments are founded in their authority and institute for their benefit; they have therefore an unalienable and indefeasible right to institute government, and alter, reform, or totally chance the same, when their safety and happiness require it.

I don’t know too many people that are “happy” with the way government runs. That being said, one of the root causation may be that too many people look to governments to make them happy, when in fact true happiness is not something that can be found in the intuition of government. To prove this all one need to ask is one simple question: If the Maine Constitution gives the people the authority to chance the government, what would you change in the government to make you happy?

Liberals will answer with: Government will “serve me” better by doing more.

Conservative will answer with: Government should get out of my life so that I can be more happy.

No one will be happy without god, but I would be more happy with less govenment. I think the Quakers would agree.

KennyRoberts
Offline
Last seen: 16 hours 4 min ago
Joined: 01/18/2005 - 1:01am
Stephen, Thanks for posting

Stephen,
Thanks for posting this. I had not responded waiting to learn more about Quakers. I still haven't had the time and Dick Nixon is the only Quaker I knew of, so I never wanted to know more.

Anyway, we all know that this nation was founded purely secular in the absence of any Christian influence, rather it was the product of the great awakening when 17th century philosophers realized that there is no such thing as a "god", that was just something men invented to control other men and primitive tribes sat in caves believing in myths and superstitions. (You have no idea how hard this was to type whilst rolling on the floor, laughing almost hysterically) The fact is that this nation would not exist nor have been so abundantly blessed in the absence of the Living God, the Mighty One of Israel. YHWH Ha Mashiach.

My interest in your post is what the rub was between the Puritans and the Quakers. Were aren't talking the bloods and the crypts here and the angels weren't hell's angels, so this have my interest.

If you have an interest in the founding of the City of Boston, GOOGLE:

A Model of Christian Charity
Governor John Winthrop
(1630 on board the Arbella)

Now you know...the rest of the story...

Stephen Carmichael
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 5 months ago
Joined: 06/19/2008 - 8:05pm
The Quakers started the penal

The Quakers started the penal system in early America and then advocate for prison reforms. When punishments was to be handed out everyone turned to the Quakers.

"Two centuries ago, Philadelphia and Pennsylvania became the center of prison reform worldwide. To understand how this happened, one must look briefly at the early development of penal practices in William Penn?s colony. Penn, who himself had been confined in England for his Quaker beliefs, abolished the Duke of York?s severe criminal code which was in effect in other parts of British North America, where, among other offenses, the penalty of death was applied for murder, denying "the true God," homosexual acts and kidnapping. Severe physical punishments were used for what were considered lesser crimes. Pennsylvania?s Quaker-inspired code abolished the death penalty for all crimes except murder, using instead imprisonment with labor and fines." PA Prison Society

KennyRoberts
Offline
Last seen: 16 hours 4 min ago
Joined: 01/18/2005 - 1:01am
Thanks again. It still sounds

Thanks again. It still sounds like Dick Nixon.

Stephen Carmichael
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 5 months ago
Joined: 06/19/2008 - 8:05pm
"My interest in your post is

"My interest in your post is what the rub was between the Puritans and the Quakers. Were aren't talking the bloods and the crypts here and the angels weren't hell's angels, so this have my interest."

The Puritans saw the Quaker Ideology as heresy because the Quakers felt each individual could have a private relationship with God and where known to practice silence and meditation as a means to find deeper understanding. This didn’t set well with Puritans because they were much more structured and where lead by prayer as Catholics separatists. The Puritans also established a State religion and enforced it regularly, known to be strict about their interpretations of the bible, so that when the Quakers began to speak openly about their views on God things got heated.

The Puritans considered crimes against the State religion to be treason. Originally some Quakers where banished from the Bay and had their tongs branded with an “H” for heretic, but when they decided to return the hangings commenced.

The Quakers where not entirely a meek and peaceable crew, In fact there where reports of them bursting into church services, yelling in the streets, banging pots and pans together, and even stripping off their clothes (to show their lack of attachment to worldly things). The two groups where equally overzealous of their believes, but the Puritans had the upper hand in the State religion. Even the King of England could not keep the peace between the groups.

Log in to post comments