Religion Census: Half of US unaffiliated; Maine least religious state in USA?

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Vic Berardelli
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Joined: 12/26/2001 - 1:01am
Religion Census: Half of US unaffiliated; Maine least religious state in USA?

Mormonism and Islam are among the fastest growing religions in America, while just over half of all Americans are unaffiliated with any denomination, according to a major census of the country’s religious congregations published Wednesday by the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies in Chicago.

The census found:
- 158-million (50.47% of the US population) unaffiliated with any religion
- Roman Catholic Church is the largest denomination with 59-million members (19.1% of the US population) but its membership is down 5% since the last religious census.
- Several Evangelical and conservative Protestant demoninations aggregately have 50-million members, making them the second-largest segment of the US religious community (14.3% of the US population), fueled primarily by a 29.5% increase in Seventh Day Adventists and a 14.9% increase in Assembly of God.
- Muslim population has increased by 166% to 2.6-million (0.82% of the US population)
- Mormon population (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints) increased by 45.5% to 6.1-million (1.9% of the US population). Although Mormons are in all 50 states, 33% reside in Utah.
- Jews number 6.58-million (2% of the US population, concentrated mostly in the tri-state New York area, California and Florida.
- Buddhist population is at 1-million, mostly on the Pacific Coast.
- Mainstream Protestant denominations showed the largest losses of membership: Wesleyan -34.4%, United Church of Christ -24.4%, Disciples of Christ -22.8%, Presbyterian -22%, Evangelical Lutheran - 18.2%, Episcopal -15.7%, American Baptist -11.7%, Missouri Synod Lutheran -9.9%.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2012/may/2/muslim-mormon-growth-spur...

Thrasybulus
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Joined: 03/16/2008 - 9:59pm
Compared to Europe, the US is

Compared to Europe, the US is still a hotbed of religion, but the trendline is clear.

Tom C
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Joined: 01/03/2006 - 6:00pm
Compaired to the national

Compaired to the national average, Maine is a spiritual desert. Also, a small numerical increase in a small population will give you a large percentage increase, so it is misleading to say it had the largest growth.

Secondly, I follow religious trends pretty closely, and these numbers don't jibe with many of the other statistical trends I've seen.

This long-running study shows the number of Catholics virtually unchanged from 2000 to 2011. Also, I found it interesting that the study referenced in the subject line estimated the number of muslims, and only that group. I wonder why?

More questions related to that study:

If you suspected the newly released U.S. Religion Census overstated the LDS Church’s growth rate, you were right. That’s because, this time around, the Utah-based faith changed the way it reported its membership to the researchers.

Change lowers Mormonism’s growth rate

Comparing comprable stats reported from the LDS churchs themselves shows a growth of closer 2.2% for 2000 to 2010.

At first glance the numbers looked fishy.

However, since it meets the secular MSM's "too good to be true" criteria, I expect it to be reported far and wide by reporters who lack the skills and cognative ability to dig behind whatever press release they are handed today.

Vic Berardelli
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Joined: 12/26/2001 - 1:01am
Is Maine really the least

Is Maine really the least religious state as this story proclaims? Or, are the internally spiritual who distrust the corruption of organized religious instutitons not counted accurately?

http://bangordailynews.com/2012/05/18/religion/got-faith-maine-the-least...

Roger Ek
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Joined: 11/18/2002 - 1:01am
There are a lot of home

There are a lot of home churches in Maine. They are small groups of families that worship together. They do not seek publicity.

Gaffer
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Joined: 12/11/1999 - 1:01am
One only has to go to the

One only has to go to the south or Midwest to see what religion is really like. I was once in Kansas City for a company school and the instructor introduced himself to the class this way. "My vocation is working for Ma Bell, my avocation is Christ Jesus. Later another student in the electronic switching class told me it was common for his church to lock the doors so no one could leave until enough money was raised to supply a need. Both thought eastern and northeast churches cold and ineffectual.

My own experience here in Maine was that a church I was attending refused to take my donation as the pastor felt I was doing it to cover my income tax donation amounts. He would not listen to my story of starting a now large church in Mass. and giving year end donations to after I received my company bonuses etc. Needless to say I quit attending that church.

Here in the Northeast I find many churches are so locked into their own denomination idiosyncrasies that they leave out God. It is their loss but most could be on fire for Christ if they stopped looking at themselves instead of Him.

pmconusa
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Joined: 04/20/2000 - 12:01am
Those of us trained as

Those of us trained as mathematicians cringe at those statisticians who put credence and validity in the responses to questions such as what do you think and how do you feel. If it was truly accurate it wouldn't change from one day to the next and you could draw valid conclusions from it. As it is it is psuedo-science and not worth the paper it is printed on. They also have the nerve to declare accuracy as plus or minus some miniscule percentage. People who believe this pap are also those who believe in the free lunch.

Roger Ek
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Joined: 11/18/2002 - 1:01am
And lotteries.

And lotteries.

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