RIP, Medal of Honor Winner, Captain Ed Freeman: Saved 29 Wounded Young Men in Vietnam

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Naran
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RIP, Medal of Honor Winner, Captain Ed Freeman: Saved 29 Wounded Young Men in Vietnam

Received via email. Many thanks to the contributor.

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Picture this - you're a 19 year old kid.
You're critically wounded, and dying in the jungle somewhere in the Central Highlands of Viet Nam.

It's November 14th, 1965.

Your unit is outnumbered 8-1 and the enemy fire is so intense, from 100 yards away, that your CO (commanding officer) has ordered the MediVac helicopters to stop coming in.

You're lying there, listening to the enemy machine guns and you know you're not getting out.
Your family is half way around the world, 12,000 miles away, and you'll never see them again.

As the world starts to fade in and out, you know this is the day.

Then - over the machine gun noise - you faintly hear the sound of a helicopter.
You look up to see a Huey coming in. But ... It doesn't seem real because no Medi-Vac markings are on it.

Captain Ed Freeman is coming in for you.

He's not Medi-Vac so it's not his job, but he heard the radio call, and decided he's flying his Huey down into the machine gun fire anyway.

Even after the Medi-Vacs were ordered not to come - he's coming anyway.

He drops it in and sits there in the machine gun fire, as they load 3 of you at a time on board.
Then he flies you up and out through the gunfire to the doctors and nurses and safety.

And, he kept coming back!! 13 more times!! Until all the wounded were out. No one knew until the mission was over that the Captain had been hit himself - 4 times in the legs and left arm.

He took 29 of you and your buddies out that day. Some would not have made it without the Captain and his Huey.

Medal of Honor Recipient, Captain Ed Freeman, United States Air Force, died in 2008 at the age of 70, in Boise , Idaho .

May God Rest His Soul.

Captain Freeman died on August 20th, 2008. I bet you didn't hear about this hero's passing, but we've sure seen a whole bunch about Michael Jackson and Tiger Woods.

R.I.P., Medal of Honor Winner and compassionate human being,
Captain Ed Freeman

************

Naran
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Joined: 10/06/2004 - 12:01am
He didn't receive a Medal of

He didn't receive a Medal of Honor for 36 years, but was finally awarded that honor by George Bush in 2001. Better late than never.

ED W. FREEMAN
Captain, U.S. Army Company A, 229th Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile)

... his commanding officer, wanting to recognize Freeman’s valor, proposed him for the Medal of Honor. But the two-year statute of limitations on these kinds of recommendations had passed, and no action was taken. Congress did away with that statute in 1995, and Freeman was finally awarded the medal by President George W. Bush on July 16, 2001.

[url=http://dailynightly.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2007/07/11/265756.aspx]Source[...

Roger Ek
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Joined: 11/18/2002 - 1:01am
Whoa. Let's make a quick

Whoa. Let's make a quick correction here at the outset. Captain "Too Tall" Ed Freeman did not "win" that recognition like it was some lucky ticket in a lottery. Ed earned it. I knew Ed personally. He was a quiet, humble professional. He wore out three helicopters that day. He would land and fuel, hydraulic fluid and oil would be running out of the helicopter. Ed ran to the next helicopter and jumped in.

You can see a depiction of some of what Ed did in the movie, "We Were Soldiers". The book is "We Were Soldiers Once, And Young" by Hal Moore and Joe Galloway.

General Hal Moore came to one of our reunions and spoke. Click on the link to hear part of what Hal said.

http://d.yimg.com/kq/groups/10614528/1689254274/name/GodsOwnLunatics.mp3

Naran
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Joined: 10/06/2004 - 12:01am
Roger, thank you for the

Roger, thank you for the additional details, and the link.

In the "for what it's worth" department, in this case, I think the term "winner" is just fine.
:)

wv_republican
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Joined: 11/23/2004 - 1:01am
Thank you for sharing the

Thank you for sharing the story, Naran and for the background about the man, Roger. Glad to hear he was finally awarded what he truly had earned that day.

http://www.cmohs.org/

Naran
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Joined: 10/06/2004 - 12:01am
How many families now exist

How many families now exist because of what Captain Freeman did that day back in 1967... how many mothers and fathers would have grieved the loss of their children if he hadn't been so courageous and determined?

God bless, and rest his soul.

Editor
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Joined: 04/18/2009 - 3:43pm
Delivered-To:

Delivered-To: editor@asmainegoes.com
Date: Sat, 24 Apr 2010
Subject: Captain Ed Freeman

The article, Apr. 9 2010 on Captain Freeman has two errors.

1. The correct date of the action was November 14, 1965.

2. Our commander, on the ground, did not order medivac to not come into the LZ. They refused to land in a HOT LZ. That's when Major Crandall and Captain Freeman came to the rescue.

Thank you for making these corrections.

I was there, in the Ia Drang, when this took place. We also had Lieutenant Joe Marm who was awarded the Medal Of Honor in the same battle.

Sincerely
Tom Desper

Naran
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Joined: 10/06/2004 - 12:01am
Dear Mr. Desper - thank you

Dear Mr. Desper - thank you for the corrections, the additional information, and most of all, for your service to our Country and your fellow soldiers.

Sincerely,
Naran Row-Spaulding

Naran
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Joined: 10/06/2004 - 12:01am
Walter Joseph Marm, Jr. (born

Walter Joseph Marm, Jr. (born November 20, 1941) is a retired United States Army officer and a recipient of the United States military's highest decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions in the Vietnam War.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Joseph_Marm,_Jr.

Islander
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Joined: 02/13/2009 - 12:16pm
And the radio operator during

And the radio operator during that battle was a young man from Maine named Ouillette (sp)

Naran
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Joined: 10/06/2004 - 12:01am
The spelling is likely

The spelling is likely Ouellette, Islander.

Bob Stone
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Joined: 06/08/2003 - 12:01am
Bob Ouellette, hometown,

Bob Ouellette, hometown, Madawaska.

Naran
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Joined: 10/06/2004 - 12:01am
Received via

Received via email:

************

"It is great to remember our veterans. I myself am a veteran. However it is very important to be accurate in the rememberance of a veteran. Especially one who received the MOH. Ed Freeman served in the U.S. Army not the USAF."

*********

I leave it to AMG's Veterans for specifics on this issue. All I know is what was reported in articles, above.

Roger Ek
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Joined: 11/18/2002 - 1:01am
As I posted earlier in this

As I posted earlier in this thread, I knew Ed (Too Tall) Freeman personally. We swapped old helicopter stories, both funny and sad. When I spoke with him neither of us mentioned any awards. He did serve in the Army, not the Air Force.

Ed died on August 20, 2008.

TANSTAF1
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Joined: 11/17/2010 - 5:06pm
THE MANSIONS OF THE LORD To

THE MANSIONS OF THE LORD

To fallen soldiers let us sing
Where no rockets fly nor bullets wing
Our broken brothers let us bring
To the Mansions of the Lord.

No more bleeding, no more fight
No prayers pleading through the night
Just divine embrace, eternal light
In the Mansions of the Lord.

Where no mothers cry and no children weep
We will stand and guard though the angels sleep
Through the ages safely keep
The Mansions of the Lord

RIP, Too Taw.

- fellow sky trooper
1/9 Air Cav (First Cavalry Division (AM))
Phuoc Vinh, RVN '69-70

Roger Ek
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Joined: 11/18/2002 - 1:01am
In March of 1998 I was in DC

In March of 1998 I was in DC and met with our two senators. The only chance I would have to visit our Wall was before breakfast so I walked there at 5 AM. I looked at the names of my friends and remembered them as young men. On the first day of spring the sun rises in the due east at 6 AM everywhere in the world. As the sun rose beside the Washington Monument the Names began to appear and it was almost as though they were blinking on, one at a time. It was as though the names were coming out of hiding and showing themselves. I wrote this on a 3x5 card I had in my pocket:

I went to the Wall this morning.
It was early, dark and cold
No one was there in mourning.
In silence I felt old.

Some joggers paused in passing
In deference to the Names.
Some children ran by playing
Unknowing in their games.

The Names came out of hiding
As the sun performed its thing
And I went back to business
On this first day of spring.

Roger Ek
3/21/98

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