Snow Scoop

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Bob Stone
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Joined: 06/08/2003 - 12:01am
Snow Scoop

I am interested in purchasing a snow scoop. Any one know of a retailer that sells them.

Vikingstar
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Joined: 01/04/2003 - 1:01am
Snow Scoop

I've bought them before at Home Depo. They're the plastic kind with a metal blade; I can't seem to find what I think is the superior wooden kind anymore.

Editor
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Joined: 04/18/2009 - 3:43pm
Snow Scoop

Bob -

True Value Hardware had a good selection. BTW, my snow scoop is in two pieces. An adjustable handle telescopes in an out of the lower half of the scoop. The threaded pieces you loosen/tighten to adjust the handle length are the weak links in the snow scoop chain. After one season I had to replace them with hose clamps.

skf

Bob Stone
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Joined: 06/08/2003 - 12:01am
Snow Scoop

I am looking for one that will last. My driveway is not massive and I think that I can handle the snow of late with a scoop. There are a few on the www.

Roger Ek
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Joined: 11/18/2002 - 1:01am
Snow Scoop

I think Bob is referring to a real Maine snow scoop, not one of those curved sidewalk scrapers they sell at WalMart and such. The real thing has a metal tip and is made of wood. You give them a good coat of wax so the snow will slide off. They have runners underneath and you can move a lot of heavy snow with no lifting. Just push down on the handle and slide the load up a ramp of snow and dump it off the end.

Aubuchon Hardware carries them.

Bob Stone
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Joined: 06/08/2003 - 12:01am
Snow Scoop

You are correct, Roger. Thanks, I check with Aubuchon.

Editor
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Joined: 04/18/2009 - 3:43pm
Snow Scoop

Wood? But Roger! Bob! That means a tree must die!

pmh
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Joined: 12/09/2006 - 9:07pm
Snow Scoop

We can grow more trees more quickly than we can grow more oil wells. And more economicaly, to boot. (Furthermore, [i]all[/i] trees die at some point.)

I have a wooden snow scoop that shows its age but is still quite useable even if my arthritic shoulders are no longer up to the task. Shipping would be awkward but not impossible. PM if interested.

knucklehead
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Joined: 02/13/2004 - 1:01am
Snow Scoop

Shoveling is exercise; when we had Winter here in the past before [i]anthropogenic global warming[/i] I have done 4 hours of it each storm to keep the driveway, the walkway, and the electric meter and woodpile cleared.

I was reluctant to abandon the handmade wooden snow scoop that had been passed down from my Father (made from Wyman blueberry boxes - still so stamped), but I had to go to the sheetmetal model or do extensive reconstruction. Sheetmetal served well for years (had two) while I scoffed at those "urban lightweights" who used narrower blue plastic ones. I was forced to lay my pure hands on the plastic while helping a friend - and discovered they are light and slide easily over all kinds of snow (just like no-wax X-C skis). I am now on my second one, and no regrets.

Plastic is the way to go, just drill through the scoop and into the steel handle and drive two or three sheetmetal screws on each side to keep those "adjustable" handles Scott mentions from doing so at inopportune times.

Second of Four
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Joined: 05/29/2004 - 12:01am
Snow Scoop

Don Fogg from Saco, who was the maker of the "E.S. Cole" wooden snow scoops that you used to see everywhere, passed away a few years ago. His patterns for the differant sized scoops were passed on to his sons, I believe. I'll try and find out. The scoops he made were great snow movers, much better than the plastic ones.

Bullseye
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Joined: 03/20/2000 - 1:01am
Snow Scoop

E.S. Cole Company of Sanford has manufactured wooden snow
scoops for decades.

They are equiped with metal cutting edges and runners.

Bob Stone
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Joined: 06/08/2003 - 12:01am
Snow Scoop

Thanks for all the feedback. I want a durable one that slides easily. I have plenty of room to push the snow into.

BlueJay
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Joined: 04/18/2005 - 12:01am
Snow Scoop

[quote="knucklehead"]Shoveling is exercise; I have done 4 hours of it each storm to keep the driveway, the walkway, and [i][b]the electric meter[/b][/i] and woodpile cleared.[/quote/]
:?: But isn't that part of the meter reader's job? To wade through the snow to get to it? :lol:

knucklehead
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Joined: 02/13/2004 - 1:01am
Snow Scoop

Oh, yeah, I forgot. Throw in some brush and a few worn out kitchen appliances in the area to liven things up, maybe stake [i]Harley[/i] the 150 lb Rottie nearby on his 3/8" chain that reaches [i]just up to[/i] the service. Meter readers need exercise, too.....and then you'll get an "estimate" on your bill that you'll like that a lot better.

Speaking as a formerly rabid "the old way is always better" adherent, the plastic ones slide better and keep you from using the scoop in a manner unintended by its designers (loosening the last row of firewood or the pallet it sat on, busting ice banks, etc) and shocking the cosnoikies out of everything between your fingers and shoulders.

Melvin Udall
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Joined: 05/01/2002 - 12:01am
Snow Scoop

I guess I've never seen one of these, and I can't picture one from what you have been saying.

Can anyone post a picture of one?

knucklehead
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Joined: 02/13/2004 - 1:01am
Snow Scoop
Melvin Udall
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Joined: 05/01/2002 - 12:01am
Snow Scoop

I've seen plenty of these. Remind me of what makes them so great?

Bob Stone
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Joined: 06/08/2003 - 12:01am
Snow Scoop

If you have a short driveway, why not get the exercise, use less energy, and save the cost of a snowblower?

Melvin Udall
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Joined: 05/01/2002 - 12:01am
Snow Scoop

Yeah, but what's so magical about how they work, compared to any other number of implements?

Roger Ek
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Joined: 11/18/2002 - 1:01am
Snow Scoop

No lifting, but the wooden ones are better. Plastic wears out quickly on pavement.

knucklehead
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Joined: 02/13/2004 - 1:01am
Snow Scoop

Roger - I know, but it didn't on my old asphalt (I bet it would on gravel) and it glides better than the wooden one on steel runners. I also thought the balance was better.

I demand good service from my tools and expect them to perform well with regular maintenance. I usually repair rather than replace a lot of things, but waste no time repairing things that do not give good service. I've used two sheet metal ones until they ripped up the corners, then riveted more metal on for a couple more seasons. This plastic one just did the same thing after about the same time period as sheetmetal - it's now patched with riveted pieces from an old bondo mixing palette. I used the handle from the first old sheetmetal one to make a plywood garden cart and the other one is up in the shed waiting to donate sheet metal or handle to something else.

The plastic weenie homeowner scoop has moved hundreds of yards of snow and it has earned the right to be called a Good Tool.

LMD
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Joined: 02/24/2003 - 1:01am
Snow Scoop

There may be no lifting invovled, but I can only imagine a whole lot of shoving - and for great distances, too - regardless of driveway length.

Maybe those who use them live in areas where snow doesn't drift. But, we don't. And every winter we have to plow/blow/shovel the first fall [i]at least [/i]10-15 feet if not further, beyond the perimeters of the driveway just to assure there will be room for more.

I hate snow.

Melvin Udall
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Joined: 05/01/2002 - 12:01am
Snow Scoop

Yeah. I can't really see them being much use either. How can you push snow into more snow?

Bob MacGregor
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Joined: 12/13/2003 - 1:01am
Snow Scoop

You get the hang of it pretty quickly. Let it ride up over the bank and dump it on the other side. You can move a lot of snow at once with minimal effort, and virtually no lifting.

Kennebec
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Joined: 12/24/2003 - 1:01am
Snow Scoop

Here are some pictures of the wooden model. This one hasn't been used in a few years.

Front View

[img]http://www.ralphandnancy.com/images/SnowScoopFront.JPG[/img]

Back View

[img]http://www.ralphandnancy.com/images/SnowScoopBack.JPG[/img]

Ayn Now
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Joined: 05/05/2007 - 5:26pm
Snow Scoop

What are the chances there would be 2 pages of replies if this web site were in any other state?

Only in Maine can a SNOW SCOOP bring debate- and firm positions defended to the end...

Made me smile.

Ayn

knucklehead
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Joined: 02/13/2004 - 1:01am
Snow Scoop

There's nothing funny about a rousing debate about good tools.

In the interest of full disclosure, however, which my worthy opponent [i]yet[/i] to do.....:D

[img]http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa258/Knuck77/79%20Ford%201700/Plow.j...

FLAMMENWERFER
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Joined: 03/27/2005 - 1:01am
Snow Scoop

So this isn't a sensational expose of some malfeasance by Maine's senior senator first revealed on AMG.

I'm afraid I have nothing to add to the Snow Scoop Question. I have a brother-in-law (brevet rank) with a plow and a front loader who seems to enjoy snow removal. I indulge this peculiar whimsy.

ListenASec
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Joined: 09/18/2002 - 12:01am
Snow Scoop

Snow scoops were a way of life when we were kids.... not for the driveway, but for the POND. Slap the skates on and push the scoop in front to keep the "skating rink" clear. Sometimes after a real heavy snow, someone would come down with the bucket loader and clear it again for us. But that a little messier, so we always went over it with the scoop again anyway. My grandfather used to make his own, and there is still one kicking around the farm somewhere. Hasn't been used for years though.

By the way, Agway stores sell them too.

angler.k
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Joined: 02/11/2006 - 1:19pm
Snow Scoop

I've got a metal scoop,,, I don't remember where it came from. It didn't have any runners, so I added a couple of wooden strips to the bottom and it's much better. A spray of PAM helps keep the snow from sticking, as it does some days, and makes it easier to push. Pam also works on snowblowers for a while.

Bullseye
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Joined: 03/20/2000 - 1:01am
Snow Scoop

The wooden scoop has some advantages over the plastic (China)
models.

The runners and handle are designed to give the scoop
operator optimum leverage to facilitate lifting the snow
from the pile.

Components can be replaced when worn or damaged.

Made in America, and better yet, right here in Maine.

The E. S. Cole scoops came in a range of sizes, they even
had a children's model.

The most common size was around 3' wide and a little more
than 3' deep.

I oiled mine with snow plow wax manufactured by
The C. B. Dolge Company of Westport, Conn. Kept the snow
from sticking and reduced the friction when
inserting the scoop in the snow bank.

These days I prefer my Michigan Loader with a 12' Wausau
hydraulic angling plow.

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