Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is Prou

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Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is Prou

Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2003
From: Elizabeth Wenk
Subject: SNOWE SECURES AGREEMENT ON FY 2004 BUDGETSNOWE SECURES AGREEMENT ON FY 2004 BUDGET
[i]Snowe, Voinovich secure agreement that will assure tax cuts are limited to $350 billion
at each stage of Senate consideration, including conference[/i] WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Senator Olympia J. Snowe (R-Maine) Friday said that, with Sen. George Voinovich (R-Ohio), she has secured the commitment of the Senate's tax-writing conference that tax cuts included in the conference report under reconciliation will not exceed $350 billion. With this assurance, provided to Snowe and Voinovich Thursday night by Senate Finance Chairman Chuck Grassley, who will chair the tax conference committee, Snowe said she will cast her vote for the Fiscal Year 2004 Budget Resolution that limits tax cuts to $350 billion through both the Senate Finance Committee and floor consideration of any growth package."This commitment achieves all of the goals Senator Voinovich and I have been working for these past six weeks, as we have secured passage of a budget to impose discipline on our federal spending for the coming fiscal year, and provided funds for a strong, reasonably-sized economic stimulus package that can create jobs and opportunities in the short term. At the same time, this agreement will assure that revenue reductions will be limited to $350 billion - an amount we believe is the right size to achieve this growth without ballooning budget deficits," said Senator Snowe, a member of the Senate Finance Committee, which will write the tax package."Perhaps even more important, this agreement will also encourage bipartisan passage of the immediate economic stimulus package our economy needs to help reverse the recent loss of jobs and spur additional recovery. I share the President's goal of taking steps in the short-term to strengthen this economic outlook, and believe the size of this agreement provides room to enact a reasonably-sized package of tax cuts to spur economic growth," Snowe said. "Our approach also reflects that $350 billion may represent the largest tax cut a majority of the Senate will support. I believe our approach bridges differences between the many Democrats who support either a small tax cut or none at all, and the many Republicans who would vote for an even higher figure."Snowe praised the commitment demonstrated by Majority Leader Bill Frist, Senate Budget Chairman Don Nickles, and Senate Finance Chairman Chuck Grassley in finding agreement needed to secure passage of a budget. "Majority Leader Frist has shown incredible patience and unflagging persistence in bringing this budget conference report to a vote on final passage - in a form around which we can coalesce," Snowe said. "In the same light, I commend my friend, Chairman Nickles, for his Herculean efforts in forging and producing this budget." And Snowe credited Senator Grassley with bringing together the agreement. "Without Senator Grassley's commitment, we would not be passing this budget today," she said.Snowe said the budget agreement provides instructions for both the Senate and the House of Representatives to write growth packages not to exceed $550 billion, and the Senate is further instructed that no tax package under budget reconciliation rules may be more than $350 billion.To guarantee their position, Snowe and Voinovich secured language and commitments that:- The tax reconciliation bill reported by the Senate Finance Committee may not be more than $350 billion;- The tax reconciliation bill passed by the United States Senate may not be more than $350 billion, unless additional tax cuts are specifically offset or paid for; andSenator Grassley, the Finance Committee Chairman who will chair the conference committee on the tax reconciliation bill, has assured Snowe and Voinovich that revenue reductions in the conference report package will not exceed $350 billion."Our agreement provides written confirmation from the Senate Majority Leader that the Senate will at no point consider the House-passed legislation, except when it is necessary to be sent to conference, and provide the protections we have sought to ensure a responsibly-sized tax package," Snowe said. This not only ensures that Finance Committee jurisdiction is not compromised, but also affirms the Leader's commitment to protect the process established by Senate rules. Senator Snowe said that the agreement reflects the principles on which she has held firm throughout consideration of the budget. "Along with Senators Voinovich, Baucus and Breaux, I signed my name in March to a letter committing to work in a bipartisan manner to pass a budget resolution, and to work to maintain tax cuts of no more than $350 billion through reconciliation. This bill will reflect both goals.""I believe this is a responsible, well-balanced approach to stimulate our economy in the short term, and to protect our economy from the effects of unnecessary deficits in the long term," Snowe said. "With global uncertainties that have cast a shadow over a domestic economy already on shaky ground even before September 11th, I believe an immediate growth package is absolutely essential to help avoid a jobless recovery or - worse - a double-dip recession," Snowe said. "I look forward to working with Chairman Grassley and my colleagues on the Finance Committee to craft such a plan.""We must work to maintain a carefully-calibrated plan that will produce short-term benefits for our economy, without jeopardizing long-term fiscal responsibility and economic growth. By capping the size of tax cuts at $350 billion, I believe we can do so without risking the types of deficits that could come from deficit-financing of long-term tax cuts," she said."At the same time, we have also passed a budget, which I believe is critical because it imposes structure and discipline on Congress, and defines the priorities in federal expenditures. This is a fundamental responsibility of the Congress, and I am pleased we have been successful in passing a budget this year," Snowe said. She said passage of a budget is essential as the Senate works to address other priorities of importance to the American people, such as enactment of a prescription drug benefit for Medicare beneficiaries, reauthorizing federal welfare law, and providing for a strong homeland defense.Snowe noted that she and Senator Voinovich had sealed their deal with Chairman Grassley with a handshake after reaching agreement late Thursday evening. "Just as I trusted the word of the Majority Leader as we agreed to address extraneous special interest provisions in homeland security legislation last fall, so I trust the word of Chairman Grassley today. I happen to believe in the power of a senator's word - and believe that Washington would be a better place if we could have more leaders like Senator Grassley whose word is his bond," said Senator Snowe.###

Anonymous
Re: Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is

Why doesn't she just change parties.

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Re: Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is

Congress Approves Record $2.27T Budget
4/10/03

By MARY DALRYMPLE, AP Tax Writer WASHINGTON - Congress approved a record $2.27 trillion federal budget Friday, winning a razor-thin Senate victory after Republican leaders promised to limit new tax cuts to half the amount President Bush has proposed. With lawmakers eager to begin a two-week recess, the Senate passed the budget on a vote that required Vice President Dick Cheney to break a 50-50 tie. The House had approved it a few hours before dawn. The budget language allows for new tax cuts up to $550 billion over the next decade, a figure supported by the House in an effort to win over more senators. However, [b]moderate GOP Sen. Olympia Snowe of Maine demanded and received promises from her party's leader that any tax cut bill sent to the White House won't exceed $350 billion. Bush's proposal is for $726 billion, reductions he says are needed to revive the economy.[/b] Senate Finance Committee Chairman Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, assured Snowe that he and Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee would not support a larger cut. "There would be no budget and no growth package without our agreement," Grassley said, expressing regret that the reductions would not be larger. Meanwhile, House and Senate negotiators were still working to break a stalemate over millions of dollars in projects attached to separate legislation to spend $80 billion for war and domestic security. That bill would make a $2.5 billion down payment on the costs of reconstruction in Iraq and give $3.1 billion in aid to the airline industry and its laid-off workers. Lawmakers want to complete both measures before a two-week spring recess and were aiming to conclude their efforts as soon as this weekend. The House and Senate will return from the break to settle deep differences between the chambers over key pieces of the president's domestic policy. Also on Friday, the House passed a comprehensive energy package that would allow oil exploration in an Alaska wildlife refuge, one of Cheney's top priorities. The Senate rejected the Alaska drilling policy last month. The House also sides more closely with the administration on taxes, having passed a budget would allow cuts of as much as $550 billion through 2013. Last month, the House agreed to all of the $726 billion that Bush says is needed. But after the deal struck in the Senate on Friday, House tax-writers will have to accept smaller reductions. The Senate has shown little appetite for passing a large tax cut this year and voted earlier to slash the president's original plan to $350 billion. Moderate Republican Snowe of Maine and George Voinovich of Ohio refused to accept anything more. Acknowledging the impasse between the House and the Senate, Grassley persuaded Senate Republican leaders to back the smaller cut. [b]"As much as I wish it weren't so, that is the political reality," Grassley said while announcing the budget deal. "The reality is that the Republican caucus is split."[/b] "Logic prevailed," Voinovich said. The House voted narrowly, 216-211, to pass the budget early Friday morning. Grassley said he would use the $350 billion to accelerate already scheduled income tax reductions, marriage penalty relief and child tax credit increases. He also plans to allow small businesses to write off more of their new investments. The Senate will not have room to include the president's proposal to reduce taxes on corporate dividends unless its cost is offset by increasing taxes or closing tax loopholes. The budget is a nonbinding resolution used by Congress to outline tax and spending policy. It projects deficits will peak next year at $385 billion, then decrease gradually until a $10 billion surplus is reached in 2012. It permits the spending controlled by Congress to grow less than 3 percent next year, to $785 billion. More than half that money — $400 billion — will go to defense. The blueprint also budgets $400 billion for lawmakers to develop a Medicare prescription drug benefit later this year.

Pharmer
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Re: Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is

Olympia darling, just remember NH and what is currently happening in PA. You are next.

samadams
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Re: Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is

Be truthful now. Did any of you loyal Republicans ever expect her to act any other way?

Martin
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Yup

Yup

landry
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Re: Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is

Olympia votes the way she does because she is a socialist. Olympia is smarter and wiser than we the people are. Queen Olympia knows much better how to spend her subjects money than they do. If you do not believe me just ask the queen. As long as the republicans keep voting for her she will keep stepping on them and betraying them on the floor of the senate. The queen is never wrong.
Bud[ 04-12-2003: Message edited by: budlandry@mid ]

Anonymous
Re: Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is

Olympia is a Republican :confused: :confused:

Anonymous
Re: Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is

The Sun-Journal ran a front page, celebratory article with the Senator beaming from behind a stack of papers. We need to have a honest-to-goodness Republican in the next primary against her. She needs to GO![img]http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20030411/capt.1050083991.snowe...[ 04-12-2003: Message edited by: Editor ]

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Re: Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is

Senate OKs Budget, Slashes Bush Tax Cut
4/12/03
By MARY DALRYMPLE, AP Tax Writer WASHINGTON - Congressional passage of a 2004 budget that would allow up to half a trillion dollars in new tax cuts has Republicans fighting among themselves over a promise to Senate moderates to restrict the reductions to just $350 billion. The Senate passed the record $2.27 trillion budget by the thinnest of margins Friday after Senate leaders secured the votes of two skeptical moderates. They won their support by promising to hold new tax cuts passed this year to less than half the amount President Bush wanted. After Vice President Dick Cheney cast the tie-breaking vote to pass the budget in the Senate, 51-50, House Republican leaders announced they had no knowledge of a "secret tax plan" struck between Senate Finance Committee Chairman Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, and the moderates. House leaders made no secret of their intent to move Grassley out of the way and pass a larger tax cut. "Senator Grassley is a good man, but he is only one man on one side of this debate," said House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, R-Texas. House Speaker Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., called Grassley "irrelevant." Grassley said he struck the deal because the budget would not pass without the votes of moderate Republican Sens. George Voinovich of Ohio and [b]Olympia Snowe[/b] of Maine. They had drawn a line a month ago vowing to block any more than $350 billion in tax cuts over the next decade, expressing concerns that war spending and rising deficits make larger tax cuts unaffordable. [b]Snowe dismissed the pressure brought to bear by the White House and others asking her to change her mind. "Not pressure," she said. "Pressure is fighting in Iraq."[/b] The budget passed Friday projects that deficits will peak at a record $385 billion next year, then decline gradually until producing a surplus in 2012. It calls for the spending controlled by Congress to grow less than 3 percent next year, to $785 billion. More than half that money — $400 billion — would go to defense. The blueprint also budgets $400 billion for lawmakers to develop a Medicare prescription drug benefit later this year. The $726 billion tax cut was the centerpiece of the president's economic agenda, but Grassley said those who declare a $350 billion tax cut a defeat for the president "view this important responsibility solely from a political angle." "I'd say the same thing about my Republican friends that use that same characterization," he added. The president and two Cabinet secretaries issued statements pledging to get the biggest possible tax cut. "The budget resolution provides for a jobs and growth package of up to $550 billion, and we will work with the Congress to provide the greatest amount of tax relief to stimulate the economy," Bush said. [b]Grassley said the deal spells the end of the president's proposal to reduce taxes on the corporate dividends paid to shareholders, unless its cost can be offset by other changes in tax law.[/b] He planned to use his $350 billion allowance to speed up tax cuts already scheduled in future years that will reduce income tax rates, increase the child tax credit and reduce the marriage penalty. He also wants to let small businesses expense more of their new investments. House tax-writers say a $550 billion tax cut would allow them to accelerate planned income tax reductions, while also reducing taxes on dividends paid to shareholders. The House voted narrowly, 216-211, to pass the budget a few hours before dawn Friday. [b]The budget puts in place a nonbinding outline that lawmakers will use to write tax and spending policy. In the Senate, it gives critical protection to tax cuts that might otherwise face a filibuster[/b]. [url=http://news.yahoo.com]http://news.yahoo.com[/url]

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[i]AMG Editor: The plot thickens?[/i]Senate Vote Could Slash Bush Tax Cut in Half
4/12/03
By DAVID E. ROSENBAUM The New York Times WASHINGTON, April 11 With Vice President Dick Cheney casting the tie-breaking vote in the Senate, Congress approved a $2.2 trillion budget plan today that would make room for a tax cut this year but possibly limit it to less than half the size President Bush proposed. The turning point one of the rare occasions when the outcome of important legislation turned on a single speech came when Senator Charles E. Grassley, the Iowa Republican who is chairman of the Finance Committee and a politician with a reputation for keeping his word, promised on the Senate floor that he would not permit, under any circumstances, a law this year that would reduce taxes by more than $350 billion over 10 years. That pledge won the votes of two recalcitrant Republicans who had promised in writing to oppose any tax cut of more than $350 billion. The switch produced the 50-to-50 tie, allowing Mr. Cheney to break it. President Bush has sought tax reductions totaling $726 billion. Shortly before 3 this morning, the House voted, 216 to 211, to approve a budget blueprint that would permit a tax cut of $550 billion an amount, White House officials said, that would allow Mr. Bush to accomplish most of his program and claim a political victory. Today's votes means that Mr. Bush is in position to win approval from a closely divided Congress of the second major tax cut of his administrationm this one occurring during a time of looming budget deficits. A $350 billion tax cut, the largest the Senate would agree to, would probably preclude a central element of Mr. Bush's plan: the elimination of income taxes on most stock dividends. After the Senate vote, the White House issued a statement in Mr. Bush's name that said, "I look forward to working with the full Congress to provide the tax relief necessary to grow our economy and create jobs." Because of the president's popularity in the glow of his triumph in Iraq and some parliamentary sleight of hand Republican Congressional leaders performed overnight the House position at first seemed likely to be the dominant one when actual tax legislation is considered by Congress later in the year. Representative John M. Spratt Jr. of South Carolina, the senior Democrat on the House Budget Committee, complained after the House vote that the deal Republican leaders had made a $550 billion tax cut limit in the House, a $350 billion limit in the Senate but $550 billion when a final version of tax legislation is prepared by a House-Senate conference committee was "a recipe for getting rolled." [b]But four Republican senators, John McCain of Arizona, Lincoln D. Chafee of Rhode Island, Olympia J. Snowe of Maine and George V. Voinovich of Ohio, stood fast against Mr. Bush and were prepared to vote against the deal their leaders struck[/b]. In the House early this morning, 216 Republicans voted for the budget plan, while 7 Republicans, 203 Democrats and 1 independent opposed it. The budget plan, called a budget resolution, merely sets limits on spending and revenue but does not deal with specifics and does not carry the force of law. It does, however, establish the maximum amount of tax cuts that will be protected from filibuster when tax legislation is before the Senate. [b]Because almost all Democrats oppose any tax cut at all, the Republican defections would have caused the entire budget resolution to be defeated, and that would probably have meant no tax cut whatsoever. Mr. Grassley[/b], the most influential senator on tax matters, [b]turned matters around[/b] in midafternoon. [b]In a dramatic speech, he told the Senate that he personally supported the president's position, a $726 billion tax cut, but that his pledge to hold the tax cut to $350 billion was the only way to win a majority for a budget plan[/b]. "This isn't about the president," Mr. Grassley proclaimed. "It isn't about the House. It isn't about the Senate. It's about doing our job. It's about doing the people's business." After Mr. Grassley's speech, Mr. Voinovich walked across the Senate floor, shook Mr. Grassley's hand and then, grinning broadly, threw his arm around his shoulder. [b]Ms. Snowe said: "I trust the word of chairman Grassley today. I happen to believe in the power of a senator's word and believe that Washington would be a better place if we could have more leaders like Senator Grassley, whose word is his bond."[/b] About two hours after the speech, the Senate cast its 50-to-50 vote for the budget resolution, with Mr. Voinovich and Ms. Snowe in favor. Senator Zell Miller of Georgia was the only Democrat voting for it. Mr. McCain and Mr. Chafee were the only Republicans voting against it. [b]Republican leaders in the House were blindsided by the development in the Senate and were seething[/b]. Representative Tom DeLay of Texas, the majority leader, said he had "blood coming from my tongue, having bitten it several times over the last couple of hours." [b]Speaker J. Dennis Hastert, Republican of Ohio, said: "The secret agreement that was supposedly reached by Senator Grassley and Senator Snowe violates the spirit of this budget compromise. With all due respect to Senator Grassley, he is ultimately irrelevant because our agreement was made with the Senate leadership, and they have the power to keep it."[/b] [b]The Republican leaders in the House cannot be counted out from pursuing a larger tax cut. They enforce strict discipline in their ranks, and could well come up with a maneuver as the year wears on to outflank Mr. Grassley and the Senate. They certainly will not relent to the smaller tax cut favored in the Senate without a fierce fight[/b]. But at least as of tonight, the intractability of the Republican defectors in the Senate and Mr. Grassley's formidable reputation for straight-talking seemed to mean that Mr. Bush and Republican leaders in Congress have an uphill fight if they hope to get a tax reduction larger than $350 billion. Mr. Grassley opened his speech by borrowing from a famous address by one of his political heroes, Senator Barry Goldwater. [b]"Let me remind you," Mr. Grassley declared, "that tax policy at the expense of no budget resolution is a vice. Moderation in tax policy in pursuit of a budget resolution is a virtue."[/b] The budget plan shows a deficit of $385 billion in the fiscal year 2004, which begins Oct. 1, the largest deficit ever in dollar terms. It projects the deficit to decline annually until the budget is balanced in 2012. Fiscal experts agree that these calculations are unrealistic. The resolution includes no money for keeping troops in Iraq after Sept. 30 and no funds for postwar reconstruction. It also envisions spending limits lower than Mr. Bush proposed, so low in fact that they would not cover the same level of services the government is providing this year. The plan also shows military budgets after 2008 that are clearly much lower than the president or the Defense Department sees as adequate. But spending limits in Congressional budget plans are written to be changed as the years go by. Republicans held that the budget blueprint was the right medicine for an ailing economy. Senator Don Nickles of Oklahoma, chairman of the Budget Committee, said the resolution "encourages growing the economy," "will help us win the war on terrorism," would finance domestic security and prescription drug coverage under Medicare and "maintains spending discipline." Democrats said it was irresponsible to allow a tax cut at a time of rising deficits, unknown obligations abroad and the impending retirement of the boomer generation. "It is radical, reckless, dangerous and extreme," said Senator Kent Conrad of North Dakota, the top Democrat on the budget committee.[url=http://story.news.yahoo.com]http://story.news.yahoo.com[/url]

Anonymous
Re: Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is

SKF-Thanks for editing in that picture. It is priceless!It just says "To all Maine Democrats, vote for me next time! I just beat Big, Bad Bush!"

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Press Release Source: White House Press OfficeStatement by the President
Friday April 11, 10:45 pm ET WASHINGTON, April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- The following is a transcript of remarks by President Bush:The Senate has now completed action on the Budget Resolution that funds our priorities and rigorously controls spending. I look forward to working with the full Congress to provide the tax relief necessary to grow our economy and create jobs. The Budget Resolution provides for a Jobs and Growth package of up to $550 billion, and we will work with the Congress to provide the greatest amount of tax relief to stimulate our economy for American workers.
Source: White House Press Office[url=http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/030411/nyf117_1.html]http://biz.yahoo.com/pr...

samadams
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Re: Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is

[b]IRS[/b] = [b]I[/b] was [b]R[/b]aped by [b]S[/b]nowe

larryjohnson
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Re: Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is

snowe is to the war on taxes as france is to the war on terror

Anonymous
Re: Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is

Get a good candidate to run next time in the republican primary and Snowe will melt.

Anonymous
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It's time for Snowe to go!Oracle

Doug Thomas
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Does the Senator really care if what she's doing hurts almost everyone in the country? Look at all the favorable press she's getting.Her new motto: Hooray for me too bad for you.

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washingtonpost.com Maine's Rebel With A Moderate Cause
Senator Sides With Democrats on Tax Cut By Juliet Eilperin
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, April 9, 2003; Page A19
Sen. Olympia J. Snowe (R-Maine) doesn't come across as a rebel. But her recent vote with the Democrats in the Senate to slash President Bush's proposed tax cut -- to $350 billion from $726 billion -- represents a heretical move for a Republican in a town dominated by a GOP-led White House, Senate and House.Rarely is one lawmaker so critical to the outcome of a high-visibility, high-stakes policy. But Snowe, an unassuming New Englander with a prized seat on the Finance Committee, is the focus of fierce lobbying from all sides this spring, as House and Senate members wrangle over the eventual size and shape of a new 10-year tax cut. Because she supported Bush's tax cut plans in the past, she is considered the most vulnerable to pressure.Snowe's decision to join forces with Sen. George V. Voinovich (R-Ohio) and Democrats on the budget resolution -- which would limit the cut to $350 billion -- proved there is still some fight in GOP moderates, whose influence has steadily waned in recent years. Snowe portrayed her action as simply an effort to broker a compromise; many Democrats wanted no tax cut."Obviously it's not an easy process, particularly given the ferocity of partisanship within the institution itself," she said in an interview this week. "I try to bridge the difference on issues that are important to the country."While Snowe talks in terms of consensus and moderation, those who work with her say she is willing to defy her leaders if she feels it serves a broader interest, whether it's Maine residents or a larger constituency.Part of this stems from her upbringing. Orphaned at 9, Snowe was somewhat on her own growing up. She commuted by train by herself from Lewiston, Maine, to a Greek school in downstate New York from age 11. At one point she had to spend hours convincing a police officer at the Grand Central Terminal that she and another student were not runaways.Snowe, 56, was a widow at 26. She's now married to former Maine governor John R. McKernan Jr.Sen. Lincoln D. Chafee (R-R.I.) remembers one of the first times he approached the Senate well for a vote, when GOP leaders were pressuring Snowe and other moderates "to adhere to the party doctrine.""There were senators around her and she said, 'I know how I'm going to vote,' in a strong, steely voice. That was impressive," Chafee said. "I remember her resolve. She had made up her mind."Snowe's determination reflects political savvy as well as her own thinking, since Maine voters demand independence from their elected officials. During her first campaign for the Senate, for example, Snowe handily defeated Rep. Tom Andrews (D) by highlighting her moderate credentials in the suburbs of Portland while touting her opposition to gun control in the more conservative northern part of the state."It very much reflects Maine," said Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), a fellow moderate. "They do not want a senator who blindly adheres to the party line."Snowe, like Collins, has broken with her party on issues such as impeachment and abortion. But when Bush pushed through his $1.6 trillion tax cut in 2001, Snowe got behind it, even though she had expressed reservations about its impact on the federal budget.[b]"Any time we can bring down the burden of taxes I think we should," Snowe said[/b].Looking back at the 2001 tax vote, Snowe said the $5.6 trillion budget surplus at the time, plus the fact that Bush lobbied personally to make sure negotiators included a refundable child tax credit, made her feel comfortable about supporting the tax cut.But now that the country must finance a war against Iraq in the midst of a recession, Snowe said lawmakers must exercise caution at the same time they try to stimulate the economy. A 10-year tax cut of $350 billion is an acceptable compromise, she said. Still, her move has angered some GOP colleagues, conservative editorial writers and even the president himself. Sen. Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) said he wishes "we could all be supportive of the president at this point." A recent Wall Street Journal editorial branded her, along with Voinovich and Chafee, as "Daschle Republicans." And Bush and Vice President Cheney called Snowe and Voinovich in for a meeting in the Oval Office last week, in which they unsuccessfully lobbied the senators to accept a bigger tax cut.The pressure on Snowe probably will intensify in the coming months, as the Finance Committee begins to hammer out details of any tax cut. The Republicans have a one-seat margin on the panel, meaning a defection by Snowe would give Democrats the vote they need to impose their agenda on the committee.Thomas Mann, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, questioned whether Snowe could hold out."There's so much pressure on those moderates to fall into line," Mann said.But Sen. John Breaux (D-La.), one of the architects of the $350 billion tax cut compromise, said the Senate's centrists were "emboldened" by their recent victory. "A lot of people were not able to resist the pressure she was under, with calls from the president and the vice president," he said. "By sticking together, it shows how you can be vital and influential."Snowe says she will continue her crusade to persuade her peers that she represents mainstream, rather than marginal, Republican voters.[b]"Frankly, I think I've maintained consistency with traditional Republican principles throughout my career," she said[/b]. "I don't understand why I should be on the outskirts." © 2003 The Washington Post Company [url=http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A59522-2003Apr8.html]http:...

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U.S. Newswire
11 Apr 19:00 DeLay: Grassley's Secret Tax Plan; Who Knew?
To: National Desk
Contact: Stuart Roy or Jonathan Grella, 202-225-4000
both of the Office of the Majority Leader
Congressman Tom DeLay
web: [url=http://www.majorityleader.gov]http://www.majorityleader.gov[/url] WASHINGTON, April 11 /U.S. Newswire/ -- House Majority Leader
Tom DeLay (R-Texas) today expressed his frustration at Senator
Charles Grassley's (R - Iowa) secret tax plan which in no way
reflects the position of the House and is inconsistent with the
agreement reached by the House and Senate yesterday. "The position explained today by Senator Grassley is not the
position of the House of Representatives, nor the Republican
Leadership, nor our Budget or Ways and Means Committee Members,"
DeLay said. [b]"Senator Grassley's position was not expressed by him or any
member of the Senate Leadership during negotiations with the
House," DeLay said. "It was a secret. I didn't know. The Speaker
didn't know. The Whip didn't know. The committee chairmen didn't
know. The President of United States didn't know. Even Woodward
and Bernstein didn't know![/b] "Senator Grassley is a good man, but he is also only one man on
one side of this debate. On our side will be House Budget Chairman
Jim Nussle and Ways and Means Chairman Bill Thomas and their
members. "You would be hard-pressed to find two tougher negotiators
anywhere in the world, let alone the United States Senate. The
House and the American people will count on them to deliver real
tax relief that will stimulate more than some Senators' egos." The House passed a budget that allowed for a $550 billion tax
relief package yesterday 216-211. Copyright 2003, U.S. Newswire [url=http://www.usnewswire.com/topnews/qtr2_2003/0411-146.html]http://www.usn...

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Re: Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is

U.S. Newswire
11 Apr 18:54 Statement of Speaker of the House J. Dennis Hastert Regarding Tax
Cuts, the Budget and Senator Grassley
To: National Desk
Contact: John Feehery or Pete Jeffries, 202-225-2800, both of
the Office of Speaker of the House J. Dennis Hastert
Web: [url=http://www.speaker.gov]http://www.speaker.gov[/url] WASHINGTON, April 11 /U.S. Newswire/ -- Speaker of the House J.
Dennis Hastert released the following statement today: "Earlier this week, the House and the Senate agreed to a unique
budget that allowed for the Congress to postpone a decision on the
size of job-creating tax cuts until a later time. [b]"The secret agreement that was supposedly reached by Senator
Grassley and Senator Snowe violates the spirit of this budget
compromise[/b]. "With all due respect to Senator Grassley, he is ultimately
irrelevant because our agreement was made with the Senate
Leadership and they have the power to keep it. "Working with the President, we will get an agreement that will
stimulate job creation, help spur economic growth, and help
Americans recover some of the value of pensions and retirement
funds lost in a struggling stock market. I don't know how much
this will cost, but $350 billion is clearly not enough of an
investment to get the job done." Copyright 2003, U.S. Newswire [url=http://www.usnewswire.com/topnews/qtr2_2003/0411-145.html]http://www.usn...

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Re: Two-Thumbs Down! Snowe Screws Taxpayers, Bush, & is

GOP cuts deal on Bush tax cut By Kathy A. Gambrell
UPI White House Reporter
From the National Desk
Published 4/11/2003 7:22 PMWASHINGTON, April 11 (UPI) -- Senate Republicans on Capitol Hill, worried about a rising federal deficit and war costs, agreed to hold President George W. Bush's tax-cut package to no more than $350 billion in return for support of next year's federal budget request.Sen. Charles E. Grassley, R-Iowa, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, promised Republican moderates that the tax-cut bill would not include more than $350 billion, half of the $726 billion Bush had asked Congress to provide as a stimulus for the still-sagging U.S. economy.In return, moderates pledged to support the $2.2 trillion federal budget plan. The U.S. House of Representatives voted 216-211 to approve the budget early Friday.The agreement seals weeks of haggling between the House of Representatives and the Senate. The House last month approved the $726 billion tax cut the White House wanted, with a provision allowing lawmakers to reduce that number to $550 billion. The Senate agreement may force House members to make that figure smaller.GOP moderates also wanted to see some funding for some domestic programs restored. The agreement replaced money for education, Medicare and public health.Bush met last week at the White House with a group of Wall Street economists about the tax-cut proposal. The appearance of the private sector financiers signaled that Bush continues to be troubled by the sagging state of the economy. Unemployment remained at 5.8 percent in February, up from 5.7 percent in January. The Conference Board's Consumer Confidence Index declined sharply to 62.5 points in March, down 2.3 points from 64.8 in February.The president's growth plan calls for accelerating the 2001 tax rate reductions and making them retroactive to Jan. 1, 2003. It reduces the marriage penalty in 2003 rather than 2008 and raises the child tax credit from $600 to $1,000 this year instead of in 2010.The White House last week commended Congress for moving the budget process along, but said the votes in the conference committee would set the dollar amount for the tax cut. U.S. Treasury Secretary John Snow expressed confidence the conference committee's final draft would be in the administration's favor, saying that they had the support of the House and 48 votes in the Senate.[b]Key in the negotiations was Sen. Olympia Snowe, R-Maine, who said that she along with Sen. George V. Voinovich, R-Ohio, secured the commitment of the Senate's tax conference committee that the tax cuts in the conference report would not exceed $350 billion[/b]."This commitment achieves all of the goals Senator Voinovich and I have been working for these past six weeks, as we have secured passage of a budget to impose discipline on our federal spending for the coming fiscal year, and provided funds for a strong, reasonably-sized economic stimulus package that can create jobs and opportunities in the short term," Snowe said.Republican moderates wanted to see the return of a number of domestic priorities that had been slashed from the budget to help pay war costs and as tax revenues have fallen.Snowe, a member of the Senate Finance Committee which will write the tax package, said the tax cut would be a reasonably sized package that would spur growth without ballooning federal deficits. Snowe noted that she and Voinovich sealed their deal with Grassley with a handshake after reaching agreement late Thursday evening. The White House acknowledged Friday that it would not gain approval for its full tax-cut proposal. White House press secretary Ari Fleischer said that there were still ways "within the existing smaller number, to accomplish the objectives the president sought, still standing by each of the provisions that the president proposed."Fleischer seemed to indicate, however, that Bush would still fight for his dividend exclusion provision abolishing taxation of stockholder dividends."The dividend tax plan must be included. It means the acceleration of the rate cuts must be included. It means the child credit, the AMT relief, all the provisions that the president pronounced he was in favor of, were decided upon because of their benefit to an economy that needs help so people find work. And the president has not retreated on that," Fleischer said Friday.Copyright © 2001-2003 United Press International
[url=http://www.upi.com/print.cfm?StoryID=20030411-063341-5511r]http://www.up...[ 04-14-2003: Message edited by: Editor ]

Martin
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Joined: 01/08/2003 - 1:01am
I called Snowe's Portland

I called Snowe's Portland Office today and spoke with an absolute robot!The person I spoke just wanted my name and address... did not seem to care a bit that I am a registered Republican who is dismayed and seriously disappointed that Snowe is leading the charge AGAINST the tax cuts wanted by President Bush

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