Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

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lucky
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

Just now, checking my email, I found a Gorton's ad. Those canned codfish cakes, sliced and fried, were a favorite of mine. They don't sell canned anymore but they do have frozen - - - - - 12 3oz. cakes for $45.99 :shock:

[url=http://www.gortonsfreshseafood.com/product/130?source=gortonsretail=cfc#...'s Codfish Cakes[/url]

Catherine
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

I KNOW!!!

I was looking for them a few weeks ago because I was REAAAAAAAAAAAALLY dying for them. I still am dying for them, and they have a recipe online... hint hint... hint hint...

I remember I used to eat those ALL THE TIME since you always had a can or 7 in the pantry. :D

Here is the recipe:

http://www.gortonsfreshseafood.com/recipe/00000250

The Distributist
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

Don't remember that, but last night's
Simpson's featured the dwindling stocks
of the yum yum fish...
[img]http://photos1.blogger.com/img/164/977/320/YumYum.4.jpg[/img]

Dennis
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

Those codfish cakes were a staple when I was growing up.

Anonymous
Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

Made them last night! :D

Ingredients:
1 18-20oz cod fillet
2 large russett potatoes
1 cup bread crumbs
2 Tbsp fresh parsley
2 Tbsp fresh Parmesan cheese
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper
2 eggs, slightly beaten
1 Tbsp onion, finely chopped

Directions:
1. Peel, boil and mash the potatoes. Set aside.
2. Boil the cod until it flakes easilsy. Drain.
Remove any bones.
3. Mix the codfish, potatoes and remaining ingredients except oil. Mix well.
4. Form into patties (or bite size pieces for appetizers).
5. Heat oil over medium heat in large skillet. Add patties, cook turning once until browned on both sides.
6. Titch of Rosemary

Catherine
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

Next time you make those, call me!!!!

Oh man... I am DYING for some. Hey, that was a colonial food, right?

Country
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

Paul, That looks like a good recipe and I'll try. Usually I make fish cakes with salt cod (in the wood box), but I'm going to try your recipe. There's nothing like codfish cakes and a good pot of homemade baked beans.

Anonymous
Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

I have a secret ingrediant that adds a wicked good twist:

Salmon Rub fron WildOats

francisz
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

I remember my father's creamed cod fish with peas on Fridays during Lent. It always seemed like a particularly harsh penance.

democrat
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

OK. I'm actually drooling on the keyboard :D . (I know, too much information) My mother used to make them all the time from both fresh cod and salt cod. I fish for groundfish off Jefferies Ledge several times each summer. (I also have a "secret spot" for them around Monhegan, Country) I always make fresh codfish cakes after I come in. Now I'm thinking that I could cook them right on board - why not?
I have a box of salt cod in the fridge right now - too late for supper, but salt cod cakes and beans for breakfast? :P

Catherine
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

We had haddock for supper and I asked Patrick to really salt up the fillets for me. :lol:

Country
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

Here's another secret that I'll be using when I try your recipe. If the cod is really fresh and has no smell, let it sit in the fridge until it does - anywhere from two to four days depending on how fresh it is. This develops a good flavor, instead of having a generally tasteless fish. (Maybe your salmon rub adds this flavor.)

After doing this for awhile, you'll find there comes just the right time, the peak of flavor, when the fish smells "sweet." If you let it go one more day, it's spoiled. Learned this from a man, now old, that's fished all his life and remembers when there were sow hake coming into New Harbor. He also taught me that the best way to keep shrimp is to bury them in snow. It works. They'll keep better than in a fridge. Stay in good shape for three of four days and pick out easy.

Democrat - Codfish cakes and beans make a fine breakfast, but it's a little late to get the beans going? Let me know when you're headed out to Monhegan. :wink: I've spent a few late nights out there on a mooring getting a little sleep after seining for herring with a friend and waiting for the lobstermen to get down to the shore.

democrat
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

Obviously, francisz, the recipe wasn't the best. Creamed finnan haddie (with fresh peas) on toast is a meal fit for kings (and queens)!!! When I visit my 94 year old mother, I try to bring her some fresh clam chowder (made from fresh-dug surf clams) or creamed finnan haddie just like she used to make for me. I tried to make her recipe for clam cakes once, but never could match hers.

Catherine
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

[quote="Country"]Here's another secret that I'll be using when I try your recipe. If the cod is really fresh and has no smell, let it sit in the fridge until it does - anywhere from two to four days depending on how fresh it is. This develops a good flavor, instead of having a generally tasteless fish. (Maybe your salmon rub adds this flavor.)

After doing this for awhile, you'll find there comes just the right time, the peak of flavor, when the fish smells "sweet." If you let it go one more day, it's spoiled. Learned this from a man, now old, that's fished all his life and remembers when there were sow hake coming into New Harbor. He also taught me that the best way to keep shrimp is to bury them in snow. It works. They'll keep better than in a fridge. Stay in good shape for three of four days and pick out easy.[/quote]

mmmmmmmm bacteria....

Country
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

[quote]Creamed finnan haddie (with fresh peas) on toast is a meal fit for kings (and queens)!!![/quote]

Indeed it is. My Danish grandmother made the best finnan haddie! She was such a cook.

Catherine, If you're worried about bacteria, stay away from it. Don't take any chances. But, you're going to be missing the full flavor of cod.. and hake.

Catherine
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

I'll be more liberal about it in about 160 days. :)

lucky
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

We are feasting on Kennebec's oyster stew tonight. He makes some delicious stews.

For tonight that's very satisfactorily close enough to cod until I can get some, now that I'm craving it :wink:

Country
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

Got a recipe for oyster stew? I've never made it, but I'd like to try. Thanks.

Catherine
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

OMG YUM!!!!

I haven't had oyster stew in about 10 years!!!

BlueJay
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

[quote="Country"][quote]Creamed finnan haddie (with fresh peas) on toast is a meal fit for kings (and queens)!!![/quote]
Indeed it is. My Danish grandmother made the best finnan haddie! She was such a cook.quote]

Oh, Heavens! Creamed finnan haddie is food of the gods!! :) Now this is a colonial dish is it not? One we could add to the list of "Colonial Fare" for our AMG gathering. YUM! Thanks for the mention, dem.

Catherine
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

I'm also of Danish descent!!!

eagleisland
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

[quote="Country"]Got a recipe for oyster stew? I've never made it, but I'd like to try. Thanks.[/quote]

Okay, Country, swap you Oyster Stew for your salt cod codfish cake recipe. And you should know that I fully agree on your aging-the-codfish advice. Perfectly fresh cod, oddly enough, is probably the blandest fish I ever ate.

Okay, for oyster stew: there's lots of variants, but the key is keeping the heat down. I generally start by finely dicing a small yellow onion and a rib of celery. FINE dice.

In a heavy-bottomed pot over low-to-medium heat, add two TBS good quality butter. When melted, GENTLY sweat the onions and celery until translucent. Meanwhile, either open fresh oysters or open a pack of those fresh-shucked ones. You want about 6 oysters per serving, and you want to reserve every drop of the oyster liquor. If using the pre-shucked ones, this can be done by putting the oysters into a colander over a bowl.

When the celery and onions are melting-tender, add a splash of milk or half and half to cool things down and add the oyster liquor. Then stir and add the rest of the milk or half-and-half - you'll want about 4 oz. per serving. Toss in a bay leaf. Gently increase the heat, stirring occasionally. Add a sprinkle of thyme and bring to about 190 degrees. Taste and adjust seasonings - salt and pepper. Maybe a pinch of cayenne if such is your wont. Add the oysters, and stir just until the edges on the oysters curl. Once that happens - you're done. Remove from the heat. Put in serving bowls. You can add a pat of butter and a sprinkle of fresh chopped parseley, but these are more for color than anything.

If this is anything more than a first course, double everything per serving and make sure you have some lovely crusty bread and a nice green salad.

pmh
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

The comment about letting the codfish "ripen" is a good one. Some foods, a very few, should be allowed to "turn" just a bit to develop the full character of the beast. This culture has become too antiseptic. If it weren't for "slightly turned" barley mash, where would the Scots be?

I avoid the coast of Maine like the yup-yup plague it's become - but if one is handy to New Brunswick, it's a cinch to find first-class salt fish, and not just cod. Salt pollock makes a chowder the gods fight over.

I would ammend the above codfish cake recipe to include for each 1/3 pound or so of salt fish a beaten egg.

Back to bacteria: the Virginia Cured Ham is famous world-wide. Seeing one on the hook makes one wonder, though, before it was "cured," what disease did it have?

Country
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

Eagle - Thanks so much for that oyster stew recipe. Beautifully written and perfectly descriptive.. especially the part about the edges beginning to curl.

Now I'll have to rack my mind to give you a recipe for my salt codfish cakes - which I haven't made in several years. I got into making them because a 90+ year old man, and neighbor up around the corner had, essentially, gone blind from macular degereration, was having trouble cooking, and said he like some fishcakes. So, I started making them from salt cod. It'll take awhile for this to come back to me.

In the meanwhile, I've stumbled across a sauce for scallops and pasta that I'm working on. Cut some onion to fine or medium dice, heat some olive oil in a pan, add the onions and saute until they're ready. Some people go by looks, but I generally go more by smell. Then mix in a little flour and coat the onions well. Then add chicken stock and sweet vermouth to deglaze the pan. After that gets heated add some fresh thyme. (I'm on a kick with chicken stock and fresh thyme these days and keep a thyme plant in the house - along with rosemary.)

After that's simmered at a slow bubble for awhile, add some cream and when that's heated, grate in some good parmesan cheese which, along with the flour added earlier, will thicken the sauce and add good flavor. The scallops can either be cut in half sideways, sprinkled with a little salt, pepper, and lemon juice, and sauted - or they can be cut up and added directly to the sauce, and cooked there. In the end, the sauce and scallops are spooned over the pasta.

I'm still working on it, but it comes out pretty good. The amounts of sweet vermouth and parmesan are important.

Country
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

pmh - I know what you mean about the salt fish from NB. Years ago, I took a friend down to Acadia. I was sitting in the car drinking beer at Sea Wall while she was out catching some sun, and struck up a conversation with an older feller and his wife parked next to me and we got to talking about fish. After we left there he took me down to a fish plant in McKinley (Bass Harbor) that he had the keys to and where he'd salted some cod. He brought some out and gave it to me. That cod was so good, I ate it all driving down Rt. 1 back to Waldoboro. I've never had better salt fish, and probably never will.

eagleisland
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

[quote="pmh"]The comment about letting the codfish "ripen" is a good one. Some foods, a very few, should be allowed to "turn" just a bit to develop the full character of the beast. This culture has become too antiseptic. If it weren't for "slightly turned" barley mash, where would the Scots be?[/quote]

Hooot, mon, where would ANY of us who enjoy a wee dram be? Or pickles. Or sauerkraut. Or, for that matter, a great steak: truly great steaks are aged on the carcass to the point where there's mold on the outers before the steak is cut.

Or great game, for that matter. The Brits would maintain that one should hang a pheasant by the neck until the carcass hits the floor.

Okay, scrap that. The Brits haven't been a true world power for almost a century.

But whoever noted country ham was spot on. The tastes are regional, largely depending on what the hogs et and local seasonings, but the idea is the same: in America, you have Country Ham; in France, you have [i]Jambon du Pays[/i], in Italy, you have [i]prosciutto[/i], in Spain, you have Serrano Ham... same concept, same technique, vastly different results.

We've talked of kimchee, have we not?

With the exception of fresh fish (not TOO fresh, in the case of cod) and fresh veggies, we're accustomed to favor the flavors of foods that have been preserved or stored for a bit.

Rotten food. It's what makes the world go round. :wink:

lucky
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

The oyster stew recipe Eagle gave is pretty much identical to the one we use. We add things, vegetables and maybe some bacon or fried salt pork, when we're feeling extra creative ( or want to use up leftovers).

I hope someone brings finnan haddie to the next potluck, because I've never had it!

pmh - your remark about the Virginia ham reminded me of the Boston School Of Cooking book we've discussed. I have a pretty clear memory of reading "When ham is very old and moldy" and being very glad I got my ham from the store.

eagleisland
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

[quote="lucky"]The oyster stew recipe Eagle gave is pretty much identical to the one we use. We add things, vegetables and maybe some bacon or fried salt pork, when we're feeling extra creative ( or want to use up leftovers). [/quote]

I'll use salt pork (or bacon, in a pinch) with a chowder and love it. Oyster Stew, for me, is all about delicacy. A chowder is a robust (and wonderful) dish - but an oyster stew is delivered by angels.

laMaine
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

If you want a true delicacy, have some Cod Tongue. It's a big favorite in Newfoundland.

BlueJay
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

:lol: This is great! Eagle, pmh, Country - you guys belong on the Food Network! You must come to this future AMG Colonial Gathering. What delicious sounding variations on the themes.

lucky
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Who remembers fried codfish cakes?

I agree, Eagle, there is pure oyster stew and then there is more of a chowder from extras being added. Both are delicious though, and good for supper on a dank day.

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