Who is still buying newspapers?

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maineman64
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Who is still buying newspapers?

Just curious...About two years ago, I decided to stop supporting the liberal rags. I stopped all subscriptions, and buying papers in stores. It's a known fact that all papers are hurting, due to poor circulation. They are funded and able to stay afloat through advertising. My next step, although it may seem a bit radical, is to draft a form letter to send to those who advertise in the papers telling them I will not use their services if they continue to support those anti- american rags. I know so many people who still get the "news" from the paper and, of course, believe everything they read.
Seems to me the only way to stop them is to hit them the only way we can, right in the pocketbook. Any thoughts on this? Please don't say this won't work. If enough did it , I think it would...

charlotte
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Who is still buying newspapers?

I subscribe to the "liberal rag" lmao. :lol:

Henry Clay
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I like free papers

Weekly and monthly mailed to the house - they rely on advertising but have more information about upcoming local events than the daily anyway.

Calvin
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Who is still buying newspapers?

About once a week,,,,,at random. And not always the ( paper that shall not be named)

MarkSeger
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Who is still buying newspapers?

Between the poor service and the bias of the LSJ, I haven't had them sent here for more then 5 years. Not that I won't read them if I am in the coffe shop and one is at the table.
I will not give them my service of help wanted or to advertise through them.
I support the weekly paper such as the Lisbon Ledger. To me they reach the demographics that I want to reach and them are cheaper. For me it is a win/win.
Your problem will be that there won't be enough people to do the damage or send the message that you want them to hear. The majority will gripe and groan yet do nothing to change the problems.
Do what you feel you have to and enjoy the small victory.
MM

GunGirl
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Who is still buying newspapers?

I used to subscribe to the KJ, but stopped in August when my subscription ran out. I'm just trying to cut costs wherever I can, and this was one of the easiest to cut.

Frostman
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Last seen: 6 years 12 months ago
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Who is still buying newspapers?

I bought a Ba Haba Times (or whatever that horrible piece of crap is called) on my lunch break. Learned the $0.50 lesson of never buying that POS again…

Cantdog
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Who is still buying newspapers?

Unless you're lucky enough to find one at the dump, you'll have to actually buy a copy of the paper to find out who the advertisers are, won't you, Maineman?

I stopped my southern maine sunday telegram subscription a couple years ago when they quit publishing conservative letters to the editor. Occaisionally I'll but the Lewiston sun and the Rumford paper. Good luck with your campaign against the old time media cartel.

Country
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Who is still buying newspapers?

Read the Freepress and Lincoln County News - paper versions. Read others online.

Thomas O
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Who is still buying newspapers?

Support Tom, buy the Boston Herald.

Bob Stone
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Who is still buying newspapers?

I read the Lewiston Sun-Journal cover to cover every morning. I am amazed at how the present the news to the people of Androscoggin County. I think they long ago dropped any pretense of being fair and balanced. The Executive Editor even ran a blog and bashed Bush to the heavens.

There is a nasty cabal down there that are vicious liberals. Most are imports from other states. But there are many, many other people at the paper who work hard at bringing the news to people daily that I would hurt if I pulled my subscription. The Costellos are good people and I have yet to figure out the Editorial disconnect. But it isn't going change.

Earl Nickerson . Jr
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Who is still buying newspapers?

[color=darkred][/color][size=18][/size]Haven't got the BDN for years now.Still grab The Republican Journal once in a while just to remind myself why I stopped subscribing to that P.O.S too.The Free Press my wife sometimes drags home isn't worth reading even though it is free.I wish there was a paper worth buying.

BothGuns
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Who is still buying newspapers?

Faithfully every Saturday I buy the BDN....I got a wood stove.

Earl Nickerson . Jr
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Who is still buying newspapers?

At least it is good for something,BothGuns :lol:

Mike Travers
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Who is still buying newspapers?

Subscribed to the Saturday and Sunday Lewiston Rag for the High School football season. My son plays his last game this Saturday.

David Burke
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Who is still buying newspapers?

Sunday morning habit. Drive to the local Maw and Paw store, buy a copy of the Sun-Journal, Sunday Telegram, and NYTimes.

Come home. Stick a couple logs in the fire. Make sure the coffee pot is full. Read. Think.

There's still nothing better than reading off paper. I still prefer it to a monitor.

Maine First
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Who is still buying newspapers?

laMaine,

We agree on something! I prefer reading paper to a monitor.

We have a consensus here. Perhaps we all can build on this foundation - for a new and better Maine!

heh. heh.

mediadog
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Who is still buying newspapers?

Henry Clay writes:
[quote]Weekly and monthly mailed to the house - they rely on advertising but have more information about upcoming local events than the daily anyway.[/quote]

It isn't only the daliies and most of the paid weeklies that are liberal, Henry. Some of the freebie weeklies are too, including the Forecaster and, to a lesser extent, the Community Leader, which competes with the Forecaster north of Portland.

The Forecaster has one of the nastier liberal columnists in Edgar Allen Beem whose (mostly) angry views can be found every week on the editorial page. His work, sadly, defines the paper in many readers' minds. The Community Leader lately has featured an editorial columnist who is nowhere near as talented a writer as Beem but voices, albeit slightly more subtly, the same viewpoints.

In the interest of full disclosure, The Forecaster is now owned by the Lewiston Sun Journal and the Community Leader by Blethen. The Forecaster's bizarre editorial stance, however, predated its sale to the LSJ so the new ownership can't be entirely blamed. The bottom line, though, is that the freebies are not necessarily any more balanced than the more conventional papers.

Steven Scharf
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Who is still buying newspapers?

One columnist, does not an editorial page make. I suggest you begin looking for Halsey Frank's column’s which began appearing a couple of weeks ago. They have already brought out a strong reaction from the peacenik crowd who objected to his piece on his recent trip to DC, which happened to be the same weekend as the big peace march.

The Forecaster should be required reading for all. The editor, although essentially liberal, is fair and balanced in her coverage choices. They are not n the back pocket of any of the local governments and are not afraid to tackle controversial subjects.

Steven Scharf
SCSMedia@aol.com

Country
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Who is still buying newspapers?

Paper for me too. If I'm pulling stuff off the internet, and I really want to understand it, I have to print it out. I like to have stuff in print when it comes to trying to understand something. Guess I'm behind the times....

Al Greenlaw
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Who is still buying newspapers?

What's a paper? :wink:

Al

J Fred
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Who is still buying newspapers?

We have a great weekly here in Biddeford. The Courier has a conservative editor (libertarian, really).

I get the majority of my daily news from the internet, radio and TV. For twenty years we had the Journal Tibune delivered. We had a good paperboy and were fairly happy customers.

Then, the paperboy quit or grew up or whatever. An adult took over. That adult drives like a bat out of hell, winds it up the driveway and pegs the paper at the door just as hard as he can. A year ago he broke the latticework on the door. That was the last straw. No more home delivery. Occasionally I'll read the morning paper at a coffee shop.

Once in a great while we pick up a Sunday paper, but not often.

Anonymous
Who is still buying newspapers?

Edgar Allen Beem! Talk about a blast from the past. He was a mainstay at the old Maine Times when John Cole was still around. At least he can be humorous at times, not like the whiny J.P. Devine in Central Maine Newspapers.

I subscribe to the Morning Sentinel and Bangor Daily News and have great delivery service from both. Unless there's a major nor'easter, they're on my doorstep - or close - by 4:30 a.m.

I also buy the Moosehead Messenger and Piscataquis Observer since I worked in that region for four years and love the people up there. Unfortunately, neither paper does local editorials but they run the boring puff pieces from Olympia, Mumbles, Snoozin' Collins, etc.

One weekly I do enjoy is the Belfast version of Village Soup. I'm surprised they went to a tab format, but IMHO it's still a well-written paper and nicely designed.

landry
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Who is still buying newspapers?

I discontinued the Bangor Daily Pravda over two years ago and have seen no difference in my life.
Bud

Beth O'Connor
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Who is still buying newspapers?

We still get the local paper....love the coupons on Sunday.....and the kids like to see theirs and their friends names for sports...sometimes even a picture!!!!

Thomas O
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Who is still buying newspapers?

Try to train a puppy, pack boxes, wrap fish, stanch a wound, or start a fire with your monitor. And Silly Putty just WON'T pull off those images of John Kerry so I can give him a REALLY long face...
I like the duel uses of paper.

Anonymous
Who is still buying newspapers?

At the risk of blowing my "deep cover" (I like to lurk here to get a feel for what people are thinking, wish I could find a similar site on the other side of the political fence) I'd like to chime in with a few thoughts.

RE: The Lewiston Sun-Journal being a liberal rag -- I can't speak for how that newspaper operates, but since they bought us (The Advertiser-Democrat) the Costello's have given zero editorial input. We have been handed absolutly no mandates from on high regarding how we should cover stories. We report on the Oxford Hills the same as we always have and, where possible, still try and scoop the daily paper. So, here at least, there have been none of the directives alleged elsewhere in this thread

RE: all newspapers being liberal rags -- Well, I've worked here at the Agonizer for almost two years now, and in our weekly story meetings the only discussion that's ever been had about how to slant a story has been to make sure that we are being fair on a personal level. Not once in two years have the words "Republican," "Democrat," "liberal," or "conservative" ever come up, except for one time when Gov. Baldacci was in town and we declined an opportuity for an interview because his staff would only give us 15 minutes with him. Our goal is only to initiate and facilitate a public discussion on the issues, not to hinder or support any side in that debate.

RE: all reporters being liberal hacks -- Again, among our four full-time reporters, the only discussion I have ever witnessed has been how best to tell the story so that it is interesting and informative to readers. I have never once heard or seen anyone consider first how the story impacted any particular political faction. We try and stick up for "the little guy," and Joe Q. Taxpayer, as best we can, when appropriate, but that's about it. And again, we hope to go to bat for folks on a personal level, not to benefit liberals or conservatives, or either major party, in general.

Personally, these days I am something of a political agnostic, although my personal philosophies tend to run libertarian. However, if you can tell in a news article how I feel about a subject, I have failed the reader. At our paper the reporters do write most of the editorials, and these are signed. On that page you'll see that I have, on occasion, given free reign to my love of personal freedom and personal responcibility.

RE: All newspaper's have shrinking circulations -- I do not have exact figures, that's not my department. But judging from the annual statement of ownership and circulation published every fall, our sales are about the same as last year, and up from three or four years ago. Personally, I think that weekly papers are where it's at in Maine. We give coverage of local issues that can't be found anywhere else, as opposed to the dailys which (I think) waste a lot of space on things you probably heard on the tv news the night before. Also, stories in weekly papers are often written in a style that makes them worth reading all the way through, as opposed the inverted triangle method in the dailes where, once you've read the headline and the first couple of graphs, you can pretty much stop anywhere.

Steven Scharf
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Who is still buying newspapers?

Timely to the discussion, I got the foloowing note form Chris Busby at The Bollard

Dear friends of The Bollard,

The Bollard Bulletin e-mail list is only used to send Bollard
Bulletins, but just for today I can't resist spreading the news to you
that we've gotten national -- hell, international and perhaps
interstellar -- coverage on CN frickin' N! CNN's online financial
section, CNN Money, has the story on its home page, under the heading
Personal Finance: "Business in the Making." Clicking it brings you to
the story by Steve Hargreaves (a former colleague of mine at Casco Bay
Weekly), called "Covering a 'hood near you -- online."
Here's the URL (sorry I can't make the damn thing link!)...

http://money.cnn.com/2005/10/27/smbusiness/local_newssites/index.htm

Steven Scharf
SCSMedia@aol.com

Editor
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www.buzzmachine.com 7/25/09 T

www.buzzmachine.com
7/25/09
The death of snail mail & Sunday papers

The Postal Service projects a decline of about 10 billion pieces of mail in each of the next two years, from 213 billion pieces (2006) to 170 billion projected (2010).

No, physical delivery won’t ever die. We’ll get more ever deliveries of more stuff...ordered online.

There is still a business to be had in distributing...junk mail; this is why newspapers are holding onto delivery a day or two a week.

http://www.buzzmachine.com/2009/07/25/the-death-of-snail-mail-sunday-pap...

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